Thursday, August 02, 2012

First Baptist Church of Yanceyville Pastors


Following is a list of men believed to have served as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville (Yanceyville, Caswell County, North Carolina). Whether the list is complete is unknown. Nor are the order of the pastors before Robert Ward Prevost (1922-1925) or their pastorate terms certain. The first pastor would have served from around 1840.



1. John Joshua James (1842-1850) [lived 1814-1892]
2. John Henry Lacy (lived 1821-1881)
3. Thomas W. Tobey (1853/1855 - at least 1858) [lived c.1820 - aft 1880]
4. Samuel G. Mason (1860-1873) [lived 1813-1890]
5. F. H. Jones (1877-1885) [lived 1836-1911]
6. Charles Alexander Guard Thomas (served at least in 1887) [lived 1857-1925]
7. Samuel Branson Wilson (served early 1900s) [lived 1872-1959]
8. J. R. Jones (served in or after 1891 and before 1926)
9. Leroy N. Chappell (served in or after 1891 and before 1926)
10. Oscar Alonzo Keller (possibly served one year beginning in 1907) [lived 1877-1950]
11. D. W. Overby
12. Claudius Murat Murchison (1911-1918)
13. John Albert Hackney (1920) [lived 1867-1928; pastorate term unknow)
14. Robert Ward Prevost (1922–1925)
15. C. W. Hood (1925–1927) (resigned December 1927)
16. Paul Thomas Worrell (1928–1944) (served until May 1944)
17. William Troy Baucom (1945–1951) (was called December 1944)
18. T. C. Williams, Jr. (1952–1958)
19. Paul F. Hardy (1959–1963)
20. George M. Bishop (1963–1967)
21. J. Carroll Spivey (1968–1984)
22. Stanley H. Hare (1985–1998)
23. Claude Harrelson (2000–2003)
24. Phillip T. Kelley (2004-2012)
_______________

1. John Joshua James (1814-1892) [served 1842-1850], buried at the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville. Believed called as pastor in 1842. Possibly the first official pastor. However, what role did Elder John Kerr play? Also, John Joshua James died in 1892 and is buried at the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville. Why did he return to Yanceyville? Did he serve as pastor more than once at this church?

Trinity Baptist Church historical sketch from In the Beginning . . . The Churches of Caswell County, Jean B. Scott, Compiler (2000) at 109:

In 1840, some residents of southwestern Caswell County left the Yanceyville Baptist Church (Yanceyville, North Carolina) to from the Trinity Baptist Church, which was nearer their homes. Members also came from Wolf Island, Lick Fork, Dan River, Pleasant Grove, and other churches. William Pleasants was the first pastor; Calvin Graves, the first clerk; and Alexis Howard, the first treasurer. Alexis Howard, William Dupree, and John Stamps were elected deacons. Azariah Graves, Alexis Howard, and William Slade were trustees of the church property. Calvin Graves, William Dupree, and Alexis Howard were delegates to the Association held 1840 in Yanceyville. R. W. Lawson offered a site for church and school. In 1842, Zachariah Neal from Bethesda Presbyterian Church joined Trinity Baptist Church and applied for a license to preach, which he received in the fall of 1842.

Also in the fall of 1842, Trinity, in association with the Yanceyville Baptist Church, called John Joshua James as pastor. The Association was held at Trinity in 1843, and a revival was held in connection with the Association that lasted twenty days. At this time, Judge Thomas Settle made a profession and joined the church on August 13, 1843. About this time, Hosea McNeil made a motion to organize a church at Sycamore Grove near Major Kerr's home. The name of this church eventually was changed to Kerr's Chapel Baptist Church. In 1844, the Milton Baptist Church was organized as an arm of the Yanceyville Baptist Church, and Reverend John Joshua James served three churches. At this time, Thomas Settle was Reverend John Joshua James's assistant and held services at Trinity Baptist Church each month.

The first Sunday School organized in this section of the state was at Trinity 10 April 1844, with twelve officers and teachers and forty pupils. Many slaves were members of Trinity Baptist Church.

Joshua J. James served as pastor from 1840 until January 1, 1850, when he resigned on account of feeble health. Samuel Wait, D.D., President of Wake Forest College was called as pastor but could not take up the work. He sent John H. Lacy, who served until the fall of 1853, when Thomas Tobey of Raleigh was called by Trinity and Yanceyville at a salary of $800 per year. At this time, the church had about 200 members.
_______________

The Milton Female Institute under the joint control of our Baptist Associations, the Beulah and Flat River in North Carolina and the Roanoke and Dan River in Virginia, was chartered the day before Christmas by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1844. This was a landmark academy for the Baptists, because beginning with it, in the next fourteen years, they founded and maintained more than a dozen such academies, one or more in every section of the state. The trustees, not all of whom were Baptists, named in the act of the legislature was, among many others, Joshua J. James and his relative (by marriage) Willie P. Mangum. A number of the trustees lived outside Caswell County, but they helped establish and support the Milton school. The institute opened on January 1, 1845. In 1849 the charter of the Milton Female Institute was amended to establish a male classical institute in Milton, too. This became the Beulah Baptist Male Institute but it was moved in the summer of 1857 to the centrally located town of Madison, merging the school with another one of the same denomination that was already there.

Source: When the Past Refused to Die: A History of Caswell County North Carolina 1777-1977, William S. Powell (1977) at 368-369.
_______________

The Papers of Willie P. Mangum.  Vol. 5, 1847-1894,

Page 208, "...Is a Circular Oxford Female College (May 1851)"...this printed circular states that "this institution is located at Oxford, Granville County...."  "Oxford Female College was established by the Baptist in 1851 but because of debts it was sold to J. H. Mills in 1859."

Page 210, "By order of the Board.  J. J. James, President."

At the bottom of page 210, (20), J. J. James married Mary L. Mangum, the daughter of Priestly H. Mangum.  For several years James was editor of the the Biblical Recorder.  Weeks, "Willie Person Mangum, Jr.," Biog. Hist. of N.C. V, 258
_______________

He became editor of the Biblical Recorder in 1854.

Ironically, a delegate to the May 1867 meeting of the North Carolina Baptist State Convention, Rev. J. J. James, said, "We shall have a mighty struggle in this Southern country with the Catholics. No denomination can consistently oppose the Catholics but the Baptists. All others are founded, in part, on tradition." Religious Herald, 30 May 1867, 2.
_______________

1860 United States Federal Census
Name: J J James
Age in 1860: 45 
Birth Year: abt 1815 
Birthplace: Virginia 
Home in 1860: Raleigh, Wake, North Carolina
Gender: Male 
Post Office: Raleigh
Occupation: Editor and Minister
Value of Real Estate: $6,000
Value of Personal Property: $11,000
Household Members: Name Age
J J James 45 
Mary James 26 
Rebecca James (one month old)

1870 United States Federal Census
Name: Joshua James
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1815
Age in 1870: 55 
Birthplace: Virginia 
Home in 1870: Dan River, Caswell, North Carolina
Race: White 
Gender: Male 
Post Office: Yanceyville 
Household Members: Name Age
Joshua James 55 
Mary James 37 
Rebecca James 10 
John James 7 
Anny James 4 
Lin James 1

1880 United States Federal Census
Name: John James
Home in 1880: Dan River, Caswell, North Carolina
Age: 65
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1815
Birthplace: Virginia
Relation to Head of Household: Self (Head)
Spouse's Name: Mary
Father's birthplace: Virginia
Mother's birthplace: Virginia
Occupation: Farmer
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Gender: Male
Household Members: Name Age
John James 65 
Mary James 46 
Bebecka James 19 
John James 17 
Annie James 12 
Leonard James 11 
Frank James 7 
Annie Bowe 60
_______________

Thomas Meredith (1795-1850) was arguably the most important leader among North Carolina Baptists during the first half of the nineteenth century. During his almost thirty years in North Carolina, Meredith pastored two churches on the East Coast, assisted in the formation of the state convention in 1830, and helped charter Wake Forest College in 1834. Despite these accomplishments, perhaps Meredith’s most important contribution to North Carolina Baptists was the Biblical Recorder, the religious periodical he founded in 1834 and edited for over fifteen years. The periodical served the Baptists of North Carolina (and for a time South Carolina) as an unofficial denominational organ, shaping Baptist theology, piety, and identity, as well as fostering interchurch cooperation.
_______________

That the following letter was authored by the John Joshua James of this entry has not been confirmed:

1862 Slave Letter
Yanceyville
December 24, 1862
Messrs. McGee & Williams

Dear Sirs:

I drop you a line about the negroes I now have in Raleigh, which you will oblige me by arranging as follows: Armstead can go on as heretofore per monthly payments. It seems that he ought to return $15 per month instead of $12 as money is less valuable and more easily made. The price of negro hire however should determine what is right for him to pay. I think it best for you to let Friday keep Millie and the three girls now with her if he will pay their hire monthly until I make a more permanent arrangement. For more than one reason I do not wish to hire them out by the year. Friday wanted me to make an arrangement with him shen I was down but I declined to make any.

In case it should become necessary for me to remove them out of the way of the Yankees, I don't wish any hinderance and should you judge such a measure judicious at any future time please let me know know but say nothing to Friday or any of the others about it as I have not much confidence in his fidelity.

I thought Calvin Rogers hired the oldest girl the past year, but it turns out that Friday really hired her and her mother and two little ones. The notes for this year's hire I left with you. When paid you can remit by check the price of the woman and her three children per month you can fix according to the hire of other negroes. If Friday won't take them and pay monthly, please let me know and I will make other arrangements.

Let the negroes know that I put them under your control. See if they are well clad. I got all my furniture with but little damage. Glass and crockery not broken at all.

I am glad to hear that the Yankees who threaten Goldsboro have take the back track.

With the compliments of the season I remain as ever,

Yours Truly,

J. J. James

PS If Mr Williams is as I suppose from home, Mr. McGee will be so good as to attend to the above. Enclosed is a note for Mr. Jas. King which please hand him or his father first opportunity. If Mr. J. King applies please hand him five dollars for me and charge to my account and oblige. JJJ
_______________

2. John Henry Lacy

Trinity Baptist Church historical sketch from In the Beginning . . . The Churches of Caswell County, Jean B. Scott, Compiler (2000) at 109 (emphasis added):

Joshua J. James served as [Trinity Baptist Church] pastor from 1840 until January 1, 1850, when he resigned on account of feeble health. Samuel Wait, D.D., President of Wake Forest College was called as pastor but could not take up the work. He sent John H. Lacy, who served until the fall of 1853, when Thomas Tobey of Raleigh was called by Trinity and Yanceyville at a salary of $800 per year. At this time, the church had about 200 members.
_______________

As Trinity Baptist Church and the Yanceyville Baptist Church shared ministers in the early years, query whether John H. Lacy served as Yanceyville Baptist Church pastor 1850-1853.

Historical Sketch of Catawba Baptist Church (Nathalie, Virginia): "Early records of this community mention "one Baptist house of public worship and a sabbath school". Established in 1773 by Samuel Harris, the first church was a log building just across the road from the present church. It began with a hundred members, a record in itself. Many of the older records were lost, so little is known about the history of the church before 1856. In 1856, the membership of Catawba Church was 128. Of this number, seventeen were servants who had followed the faith of their masters. Rev. John H. Lacy was pastor at this time, serving both this church and Republican Grove Baptist Church. During Rev. Lacy's pastorate, a new Constitution and Code of Laws for the government of the church was drawn up, since the original had been lost. The pastor's salary was set at $150 per annum."

John Henry Lacy [1823-1881] was a Baptist preacher who briefly from 1852-1853 was one of the ministers who opened the Southern Baptist mission in Nigeria. He was twice widowed and thrice married. His first wife, who went with him to Africa on her honeymoon, was Mary Barksdale or Barclay. She gave him two daughters, Mary who married a man named Howell, and died in 1946 after a career teaching school; and Olive or Olivia, who was also a teacher and married Nash Hardy, younger brother of her stepmother. Olivia Lacy Hardy died in 1948. The children she had were Lundrum (town clerk of South Boston VA) and Edward (a very successful banker).

A story told about John Henry Lacy is that he did not have very good eyesight. His father sent him to Richmond to get eyeglasses. On his return trip he realized for the first time that normal people could see more than a green blur on trees. He had never been able to see the leaves before.

Source: Faile and Craft Family Tree on Ancestry.com.

3. Thomas W. Tobey (before the Civil War)

Thomas W. Tobey served as pastor at the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville at least during the period 1855-1858. See the marriage records set forth below. Also, his wife, Isabella Hall Tobey died 10 October 1857 and is buried in the church cemetery.

Thomas W. Tobey, D. D. (c.1820 - aft. 1891)

"Among the early pastors, prior to the Civil War, Was Mr. Tobey, an able preacher and scholarly gentleman. His wife was buried in the church cemetery. . . ."

Source: Article dated 19 May 1951 (may have been published in the Biblical Recorder).

Based upon the following, Thomas W. Tobey was a minister of the gospel in Caswell County, North Carolina, on 9 July 1855:

Marriage Record
Groom: Thomas J. Womack
Bride: Ann E. Yancey
Bond or Marriage Date: 9 July 1855
Location: Caswell County, North Carolina
Bondsman/Witness: Thomas W. Graves
Married By: Thomas W. Tobey, Minister of the Gospel
Source: Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds (1778-1868), Katharine Kerr Kendall (1981) at 123.

Another marriage record indicates that he was a Caswell County minister of the gospel as late as 17 March 1858. [Azariah Graves married Isabella Howard.]
_______________

The Baptist Encyclopedia, 1881: Thomas W. Toby, D. D. was for several years a missionary to China; afterwards pastor in North Carolina; Professor of Theology in Howard College, and professor in Judson Female Institute; professor in Bethel College, Russellville, Ky.; pastor at Union Springs, and then at Camden, Ala.; and now principal of the Collegiate Institute in Eufaula. Dr. Toby is one of the ripest scholars in the South, a graceful writer, a devout Christian, an earnest minister, and an accomplished gentleman.

Source: Baptist History.
_______________

Whether the following Find A Grave entry is with respect to the Thomas W. Toby of this entry is not known and is shown here for research purposes only:

Find A Grave Memorial
_______________

Shanghai -

Rev. J. L. Shuck and wife embarked for China in 1835, and Macao and Hong-kong became the scenes of his subsequent labors. In this latter settlement, Mrs. Shuck, a highly esteemed missionary, died Nov. 27, 1844, and Mr. Shuck, with his children, soon after returned home. He reached Shanghai, on his return to China with his second wife and younger daughter, in October, 1847, where they were welcomed by Rev. Messrs. Yates and Tobey, who had a little preceded them. From the arrival of these brethren dates the commencement of this mission. Dr. J. L. James and wife, destined to Shanghai, were drowned in Hong-kong harbor, April 15, 1848, by the capsizing of the schooner Paradox, in which they had taken passage at Canton. Rev. Geo. Pearcy and wife, formerly at Canton, arrived at Shanghai Nov. 18, 1848, where they have since continued to labor. Like the brethren of other societies who had preceded them, they found Shanghai a promising field for Christian effort, and, with a knowledge of the local dialect, they found no difficulty in obtaining hearers. Besides the frequent ministry of the word in a smaller chapel within the walls, the brethren early made arrangements for the erection, within the city proper, of a substantial and spacious Christian edifice. This church was opened for worship on the 3d of March, 1850. The house is a brick edifice, with a belfry, and will accommodate upwards of 700 persons. Occasionally, it has been well filled, and usually some hundreds are present. In 1853,6 schools are reported as under the care of the mission, containing between 70 and 80 scholars. There is one out-station, having a small chapel and a school-house. While the brethren much value Scripture and tract distribution, they devote themselves chiefly to the preaching of the Gospel in the city, and in the large and numerous villages in the surrounding country.

On the 2d of September, 1849, three Chinese were baptized. A recent letter states the interesting fact of the baptism of the son of an insurgent chief, a youth of 18, who was considered as giving uncommon evidence of piety. Mr. Tobey has returned to this country on account of ill-health. He arrived at New York, May 29, 1850. Rev. Mr. Shuck, having been suddenly bereaved of his wife, late in 1852, returned with his family to the United States. G. W. Burton, M.D., sailed from New York, Dec. 12,1853, on his return to Shanghai, accompanied by Mrs. Burton. By the last accounts, the missionaries were much encouraged, though living amid the ravages of war. The report for 1854 says, with reference to this mission, "At no time in its former history, has the encouragement to persevere been stronger. The church at Shanghai have been permitted to receive into their fellowship an interesting young man, by the name of Asou, who gives satisfactory evidence of a change of heart. This young man was nearly related to the southern king, one of the insurgent chiefs, and was on his way to Nanking to join the army. Having found protection in the families of the missionaries, it was soon ascertained that he was a regular reader of the Scriptures, and daily worshiped God He was more particularly instructed by them; and having professed faith in Christ, and a readiness to obey him, he was baptized and received into the church. Rev. Mr. Shuck has taken a dismission, in order to enter into the service of the domestic Board, among the Chinese in California.

From Harvey Newcomb, A Cyclopedia of Missions: Containing a Comprehensive View of Missionary Operations Throughout the World, 1855, p. 277-278. Document from Google Books.
_______________

New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957
Name: T W Tobey
Arrival Date: 30 Mar 1850
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1820
Age: 30 
Gender: Male 
Port of Departure: Shanghai, China 
Ship Name: Panama 
Port of Arrival: New York, New York

1850 United States Federal Census
Name: Thomas W Tobey
Age: 30
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1820
Birth Place: Rhode Island
Gender: Male
Home in 1850 (City,County,State): Lancaster, Virginia
Household Members: Name Age
Addison Hall 52 (minister)
Carey J Hall 14 
Ferdinand H Hall 3 
Herbert P Hall 8 
Lucien Hall 10 
Roberta C Hall 6 
Lewis H Shuck 14 
Ryland R Shuck 13 
Isabella Tobey 26 
Thomas W Tobey 30 (minister)

In 1870 Thomas W. Tobey was in Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky, "teaching college." A Harriett Tobey, age 25 (born c.1845), was in his household, relationship unknown (but possibly his daughter). She was born in South Carolina.

1870 United States Federal Census
Name: Thomas W Tobey
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1820
Age in 1870: 50 
Birthplace: Rhode Island 
Home in 1870: Russellville, Logan, Kentucky
Race: White 
Gender: Male 
Post Office: Russellville
Value of Real Estate: $1500
Value of Personal Estate: $2000 
Thomas W. Tobey (50, white male, teaching college)
Harriett Tobey (25, white female, born South Carolina, keeping house)

Query whether Harriett Tobey was the daughter of Thomas W. Tobey.

Thomas W. Tobey may have been teaching at Bethel Female College in 1870:

Bethel College is a defunct college in Kentucky affiliated with the Baptist Church founded in 1854 and closed in 1964. It was a women's college throughout most of its history, though it became co-educational for its final years. The institution opened as Bethel Female High School with two campuses: one in Russellville and another in Hopkinsville. The Russelville campus changed its name to Bethel Female College four years later in 1858, taking in students continuing with the program. The college changed its name again in 1917; the Russelville campus became Bethel Women's College, and the Hopkinsville campus Bethel Women's Jr. College. In 1951, the college became co-educational and changed its name to simply Bethel College. It closed in 1964, with the Hopkinsville campus razed in 1966. A number of historical events have interacted with the college. During the Civil War, the Russellville Convention, a meeting to set up a Confederate government of Kentucky in 1861, met at Bethel Female College on its third day. The Hopkinsville campus was used as a hospital during a Black Measles epidemic from 1861-1862. Later, during World War II, the Hopkinsville campus would be closed from 1942-1945 and the rooms rented to Camp Campbell army officers.
_______________

4. Samuel G. Mason (pastor in 1860).

"Mr. Mason, who was pastor in 1860 and some years after, married and baptized most of the parents of the present generation. He baptized both white and colored members, as both races belonged to the same church. . . ."

Source: Article dated 19 May 1951 (may have been published in the Biblical Recorder).
________________

Samuel G. Mason (1813-1890)

Middle name seen as Griffin, but not confirmed.
_______________

Served as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville (Yanceyville, North Carolina), possibly from 1860 to 1873.
_______________

Deberniere Y. Mebane and Mollie J. Graves were married June 23rd, 1870 by Rev. S. G. Mason.
_______________

See the following, which indicates that S. G. Mason was pastor in 1873. Query whether he served from 1860 to at least 1873.

The Rev. Gilbert Mason was descended from the numerous family of Masons who for many generations lived in the northern counties of Virginia. His grandfather, Gilbert Mason, while yet a young man, moved from the county of Fauquier and settled in the county of Bedford. In this county Lewis Mason was born, and he resided here at the birth of his son Gilbert Mason, the subject of the present sketch, which occurred in June, 1810. When Gilbert was about ten years old his father removed to Franklin county, and settled in the neighborhood of Old Bethel Church. A section meeting was held with this church 1821, which J. B. Jeter and Daniel Wills, then called "the boys," attended. Under their preaching one of the greatest revivals ever known in that part of the country was commenced, and lasted for nearly twelve months, spreading out into all the surround churches.

In this revival, at the age of eleven years, Brother Mason professed conversion, and was baptised by Moses Green, then pastor of the church. He was soon brought out by his brethren to pray in public and to engage in exhortation. Early in his thirteenth year he was fully licensed to preach the Gospel. In this work, from the first, his whole soul seemed to be engaged. To preach, and to study how to preach, appeared to be all he thought of or cared for. Although compelled to work hard and constantly upon his father's farm, he nevertheless preached of night during the week, and on Lord's day more frequently than many who are engaged in the ministry alone. After a year or two thus spent, he became acquainted with Rev. Abner Antony, who, being greatly struck with the promising boy, obtained the consent of his parents that he should leave the farm and live with him, and devote himself entirely to Christian work. He remained with Mr. Antony about a year, when he removed to Fincastle, residing in the family of Rev. Absalom Dempsey, and attending school in an academy in Albemarle county, near the University of Virginia. There he continued for some time, preaching at intervals. From this place he accepted an invitation to remove to Richmond, Va., and became a co-laborer with Rev. John Kerr, then pastor of the First Baptist Church. From this field he was called in a few months by the church in Petersburg, and was regularly installed as its pastor the day he was nineteen years of age.

His connection with this church continued about five years, during which he baptised a large number, among whom were Dr. J. S. Baker, now of Georgia, and Rev. Thomas Hume, Sr. Upon the death of the great and lamented A. W. Clopton, the churches of Charlotte county, left destitute, invited Brother Mason to settle with them for nearly three years, when, receiving a call from Washington and Mayslick Churches of Mason county, Ky., he removed to Washington, and entered upon the pastorate of these churches. Here he remained eighteen years, preaching constantly and baptising large numbers. He continued all the time pastor at Washington, and at different times, and for longer or shorter periods, pastor of a number of churches around.

In 1853 or 1854 he was called to the pastorate of the church in Lexington, Va., the State Board of the General Association uniting in the call. Here he remained several years, baptising a large number, among whom was Rev. Mr. Hiden, now of Wilmington, N. C. From this position Brother Mason was called by the State Board to move to Manchester, Va., and take charge of the church there. He remained with that church and the churches in the neighboring country until after the war. He then returned to his old charge in Kentucky, where he remained until the fall of 1872, when, his health being impaired, he resigned and returned to Virginia. He resided in Lynchburg until January 1st, 1873. At that time, though far too feeble to travel with safety, he visited his brother, Rev. S. G. Mason, in Yanceyville, N. C., where he remained until his death, which occurred March 4th, 1873. Thus, after a life full of vicissitudes, he passed away from his labors and crushing sorrows, his heart-breaking afflictions and trials, to rest, we trust, in an eternal home.

While with his brother his friends had hopes of his final recovery, and he often said he desired very much to regain his health that he might preach more and better than he had every done. Though only in his sixty-third year, he had spent nearly fifty years in the active duties of the ministry, and forty-four in the pastorate; never engaging a day in any secular scheme to make money. Few men have ever preached more sermons or preached them to larger congregations. He said some time before his death that he had baptised, in all, not less than four thousand persons. Still in the last two months of his life he often remarked to his brother that he "felt greatly humbled, and deplored his imperfections and unfaithfulness, but that God for Christ's sake would forgive and accept him and his imperfect services." At a time when he and his friends were entertaining considerable hope of his final recovery he was suddenly stricken down with apoplexy and spoke no more.

As Elder Mason entered the ministry so early in life, it may be interesting and instructive to know something of the history of his early mental habits. The extraordinary success of his ministry in his boyhood was the result of his extensive and thorough knowledge of the Bible - thorough for one of his age. Few men know more of the Scriptures than he did at the age of twelve. He could even then repeat from memory whole books and numerous chapters, and could turn most readily to any passage in the Bible that might be mentioned. He learned to read well when quite young. From the first he formed a great liking for the Scriptures, and read little else than the Bible until he entered the ministry. This extraordinary knowledge of the Word of God enable him to preach acceptably, though so young, and was of the greatest service to him in all his subsequent preaching.

Source: Baptist History Homepage.
_______________

Providence Baptist Church History

Regular preaching service by Missionary Baptists began in our community in 1859.  Brother S.G. Mason, pastor of Yanceyville Church began preaching services in several locations until the Yanceyville Church constituted by a resolution, that the brethren and sisters in this section as a regular arm of their church.  During 1862, Providence meeting house was built on land given by the Sergents.

Source: Providence Baptist Church History
_______________

Franklin County, Virginia: A History
_______________

1860 United States Federal Census
Name: S G Mason
Age in 1860: 44
Birth Year: abt 1816
Birthplace: Virginia
Home in 1860: Yanceyville, Caswell, North Carolina
Gender: Male
Post Office: Yanceyville
Occupation: Clergyman, ___ Baptist
Household Members: Name Age
S G Mason 44
S F Mason 34
B A Mason 14
Lewis Mason 10
Saml Mason 7

1870 United States Federal Census
Name: Samuel Mason
Age in 1870: 57
Birth Year: abt 1813
Birthplace: Virginia
Home in 1870: Yanceyville, Caswell, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Yanceyville
Occupation: Minister of the Gospel
Household Members: Name Age
Samuel Mason 57
Sarah Mason 46
Bettie Mason 24
Lewis Mason 21
Samuel Mason 17
Fredrick Mason 3

1880 United States Federal Census
Name: Samuel G. Mason
Age: 67
Birth Year: abt 1813
Birthplace: Virginia
Home in 1880: Bacon, Charlotte, Virginia
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Sarah F. Mason
Father's Birthplace: VA.
Mother's Birthplace: Virginia
Occupation: Clergyman
Household Members: Name Age
Samuel G. Mason 67
Sarah F. Mason 57
Frederick D. Mason 13
Maria Bacon 13

Virginia, Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917
Name: Saml G Mason
Birth Date: abt 1813
Birth Place: Bedford County
Death Date: 26 Jan 1890
Death Place: Richmond, Virginia
Death Age: 77
Occupation: Preacher
Race: White
Marital Status: Married
Gender: Male
FHL Film Number: 2048593
_______________

5. F. H. Jones [possibly Frione H. Jones, who also was pastor at Kerr's Chapel Baptist Church 1871-1875]. Years at the Yanceyville Baptist Church may have been around 1877-1885.

F. H. Jones (1836-1911)

Name seen as Frione, Frees, Freer, and others.

Reverend F. H. Jones was born in Surry Co., N.C., Sept. 4, 1836; educated at Union Academy, David Co., Beulah Institute, and Yadkin Institute; baptized by Rev. C. W. Bessant; has done much missionary work; is now pastor of the Yanceyville church [1881], moderator of the Beulah Association, and the leading man in that body.

Source: The Baptist Encyclopedia (1881)
_______________

Pastor at Kerr's Chapel Baptist Church in southern Caswell County 1871-1875.

See: From Rabbit Shuffle to Collins Hill: Stories of Southern Caswell County, North Carolina, Millard Quentin Plumblee (1984) at 64-65.

Also apparently served at the Yanceyville Baptist Church (which became the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville) from around 1877-1885.
_______________

Find A Grave Memorial
_______________

F H Jones: Pastor First Baptist Church of Hillsborough (Orange County, North Carolina), 1872 - 1873

The church met on April 27, 1872 to discuss procuring the services of “Bro. F.H. Jones” who had agreed to “supply the pulpit ... the 2nd Sabbath night in each month.”  A subscription was taken and only $29 was subscribed “being only a few members present.”  Nonetheless, the church agreed to call Jones for an indefinite period.  Interestingly, on October 18, 1872 the church voted to invite and pay the way for Rev. C.A. Woodson of Virginia to visit Hillsboro to explore “securing his services as pastor.”  Apparently, this visit did not occur and F.H. Jones remained as pastor.  In July 1873, the church learned that “Brother John M. Blackwood & wife had taken their child to the Episcopal Church and had it sprinkled according to the usage of that church.”  Hearings were held and a presbytery, chaired by G.W. Purefor of Chapel Hill, was called to render judgment which is in the church minutes.  The Blackwood’s considered the act a dedication service and not a baptism.  Mrs. Blackwood’s letter of explanation and apology is in the church minutes.1 Nothing is mentioned about Jones after this October event.

A search of the Internet provides little biographical information for F.H. Jones.  He was pastor of First Baptist Church, Greensboro from 1867 to 1870.2   At the meeting of the North Carolina Baptist State Convention in 1877, he was appointed to a committee to investigate, “If the office of an Evangelist scripturally exists? and there is a demand for such work in our State?”3 At the time, he was pastor of the Baptist church in Yanceyville, NC and according to a wedding announcement, was still there in 1885.4   Two additional churches list him as a former pastor.  They are the Calvary Baptist Church, Reidsville, NC (1901) and the Boonville Baptist Church, Boonville, NC (1900-1903).5,6

While attending North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, Azariah Graves Thompson writes a letter home on December 10, 1905 saying, “I have just come in from church. I took supper at Mr. Lowery's on 220 Martin St., with cousin Tom. He was awfully nice to me, introduced me to lots of folks. I met Old Bro. F. H. Jones. I reckon that is his name. He told me to give you his love. Then I met Maj. W. A. Graham, and lots of folks that used to know you or Papa or Grand Papa or some of our folks.”7 Jones may or may not have been  all that “Old” - since the author was a young man and anyone over 50 would be considered old by his standards.

References:

1. Minutes of First Baptist Church Hillsborough, NC from November 19, 1853 to December 2, 1953.

2. Albright, James W.  Greensboro, 1808-1904: facts, figures, traditions, and reminiscences.  Publisher: Greensboro, N.C.: Jos. J. Stone & Company (1904).  Accessed on March 11, 2011 at:  http://www.archive.org/details/greensboro18081900albr

3. Proceedings of the annual meeting of the Baptist State Convention, 1877. Baptist State Convention of North Carolina (Creator).  Accessed on March 11, 2011 at: http://www.archive.org/details/proceedingsofann1894bapt

4. Rootsweb Genealogical Database: Caswell County Family Tree.  Accessed March 11, 2011 at: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=caswellcounty&id=I05599

5. About Our Church: Calvary Baptist Church, Reidsville, NC.  Accessed on March 11, 2011 at: http://www.cbcrnc.com/about.html

6. Pastors: Boonville Baptist Church, Boonville, NC.  Accessed on March 11, 2011 at: http://www.boonvillebaptistchurch.org/pastors.php

7. Letters written by Azariah Graves Thompson from NCSU.  Accessed on March 11, 2011 at: http://repository.lib.ncsu.edu/collections/bitstream/1840.6/568/1/0001_NoteMostofthefollowingletterswerewritten.pdf

Compiled by Reginald Carter, Historian, FBC Hillsborough
Last Updated: March 11, 2011

Source: FBC Hillsborough
_______________

Our Church History

Calvary Baptist church began as a mission point of the Reidsville Baptist Church. As those friends came and helped a little group of people here who were trying to have a church, worship was moved from the bush arbor into a small log cabin. In the spring of 1898, a one-room church building was erected.

On August 30, 1901, the people attending the mission station met to constitute a Missionary Baptist Church with 22 persons presenting themselves to make up the charter membership. They were: J. J.. McCargo, Edd Scott, Alex Delancy, J. L. Moore, D. T. Moore, R. J. Moore, and D. M. Moore; also Mrs. D. M. Moore, Mrs. Martha Delancy, Mrs. Martha Foster, Mrs. Permelia Cantrell, Mrs. James L. Moore, Mrs. Layton Ford, Mrs. Anna Dill, Mrs. James Combs, Miss Minnie (Moore) Hudson, Miss Mary Lee Moore, Miss Mattie Delancy Michael, Miss Jennie Combs, Miss Martha Lovelace, Miss Della (Newnam) Carter, and Miss Mary North. These constituting the church, Rev. F. H. Jones accepted a call to become its first pastor. Others came immediately to unite with the church as a result of revival services, and the first deacons of Mt. Calvary were J. J. McCargo, Joshia Newnam, and D. M. Moore.

The Church was received into the Piedmont Association in the fall of 1901. The building, having been the property of the Reidsville Church, was deeded to the trustees of the new church; and was dedicated to the Lord in September, 1904.

The Church was received into the Dan Valley Association in 1948, after having voted to make the change. In 1958, because of the growth the church had experienced, the need was felt to call a pastor for a full-time ministry, rather than to continue on a quarter-or-half-time basis as in the past.

The present house of worship was first occupied in November 1954 and dedicated March 27, 1955. The old building was converted into Sunday School rooms, permitting the Sunday School to be fully departmentalized for the first time. The present educational building was first occupied in November 1962, and the present parsonage in April 1963.

Our work is not completed. As our past is a memorial to lives of dedication to God, of love and toil; so our future together will sing praises to Him as we reach out to others with the gospel of our Lord.

Source: Calvary Baptist Church History
_______________

1880 United States Federal Census
Name: F. H. Jones
Age: 43
Birth Year: abt 1837
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1880: Yanceyville, Caswell, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: E. J. Jones
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Occupation: Preacher
Household Members: Name Age
F. H. Jones 43
E. J. Jones 36
R. E. Jones 15
M. L. Jones 12
Willie H. Jones 7
Daisy B. Jones 2
Annie Scott 22

1910 United States Federal Census
Name: Frees H Jones [Freer H Jones] 
Age in 1910: 73
Birth Year: 1837
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1910: Reidsville Ward 3, Rockingham, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Emma Jones
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Occupation: Minister of the Gospel
Household Members: Name Age
Frees H Jones 73
Emma Jones 65
Minnie L Jones 30
Rosa Jones 40
Emma L Jones 21
Annie M Jones 19
Helen S Jones 17
Dorothy C Jones 14
Esthel Williams 26
Frances Williams 4

_______________

6. Samuel Branson Wilson (served early 1900s) [lived 1872-1959]

"On Sunday evening, December 26, 1897, a presbytery was organized in this new meeting house at Southside [Southside Baptist Church, Winston Salem, North Carolina] composed of the following ministers and deacons:

Pastors:
Elder H. A. Brown, Pastor of First Baptist Church, Winston, NC., Chairman
Elder S. F. Conrad of Winston, NC, Secretary;
Elder Henry Sheets of Lexington, NC.
Licentiate S. B. Wilson of New Friendship Baptist Church [Winston-Salem, North Carolina]"

Source: Southside Baptist Church History.
_______________

From Graves family bible in the possession of Robert Sterling Graves April 17, 1956, and recorded by J. B. Blaylock:

The other clipping in said Bible related to the wedding of Donna Lea Graves and William H. Denny, she from Caswell County, N.C. and he from Virginia. they were married at 3 o'clock Wednesday afternoon with only members of the two families and near relatives present. Rev. S. B. Wilson, pastor of the Yanceyville Baptist Church, officiated. The bride was a daughter of Jeremiah and Donna Rebecca Thornton Graves. The reception was held at the hospitable home of the groom's sister, Mrs. Sidney S. Lea.

While the date of this wedding is not known, Donna Lea Graves did not marry until after 18 June 1900, the date she was enumerated in the U.S. Census for Caswell County, North Carolina. She was thirty years old, single, and living in the household of her father, Jeremiah Graves, Jr. Donna Lea Graves Denny died 12 February 1908 and is buried at the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville.

Thus, we know that on 27 December 1897 S. B. Wilson was pastor at New Friendship Baptist Church in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. During the period 18 June 1900 to 12 February 1908 he served as pastor at the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville (then called the Yanceyville Baptist Church). However, his actual term of service is not known as he may have begun his ministery before 18 June 1900 and it may have extended past 12 February 1908.
_______________

S. B. Wilson possibly is Samuel Branson Wilson who lived 15 September 1872 - 15 April 1959, and is buried at the New Friendship Baptist Church (Forsyth County, North Carolina).

Samuel Branson Wilson (1872-1959)

Find A Grave Memorial

1900 United States Federal Census
Name: Samuel Wilson [Samuel B. Wilson]
Age: 27
Birth Date: Sep 1872
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1900: Wake Forest, Wake, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Fannie B Wilson
Marriage Year: 1894
Years Married: 6
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Household Members: Name Age
Samuel Wilson 27
Fannie B Wilson 26
Elbert E Wilson 5
Nina Z Wilson 3
Horace R Wilson 5/12

World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918
Name: Samuel Branson Wilson
County: Sampson
State: North Carolina
Birth Date: 15 Sep 1872
Race: White
FHL Roll Number: 1766025

1930 United States Federal Census
Name: Samuel B Wilson
Gender: Male
Birth Year: abt 1873
Birthplace: North Carolina
Race: White
Home in 1930: High Point, Guilford, North Carolina
Marital Status: Married
Relation to Head of House: Head
Spouse's Name: Frances Wilson
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Household Members: Name Age
Samuel B Wilson 57
Frances Wilson 56
May H Wilson 18
Addie B Wilson 14

North Carolina, Death Certificates, 1909-1975
Name: Samuel Branson Wilson
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age: 86
Birth Date: 15 Sep 1872
Birth Place: North Carolina, United States
Death Date: 15 Apr 1959
Death Location: Winston-Salem, Forsyth
Spouse's Name: Sara Frances Bailey Wilson
Father's Name: Lewis Wilson
Mother's name: Susan Payne
Residence: Winston-Salem, Davidson, North Carolina

North Carolina, Death Collection, 1908-2004
Name: Samuel Branson Wilson
Date of Death: 15 Apr 1959
Death City: Out of County
Death County: Davidson
Death State: North Carolina
_______________

7. J. R. Jones (served in and/or after 1891 and before 1926)

The Milton Baptist Church was admitted to the Beulah Association in 1843. There are records from 1891 until today [c. 2000] . Pastors who served from then until today [c. 2000] include: John McDonald, J. R. Jones, James Armstrong, L. N. Chapell, R. J. Bateman, J. J. Adams, L. M. Holloway, J. J. Faulkner, C. W. Reed, Henry T. Allison, J. F. Davis, J. A. Hackney, R. W. Prevost, Hugh L. Nichols.

Source: Milton Baptist Church (Caswell County, North Carolina).

8. Leroy N. Chappell (served in and/or after 1891 and before 1926)

He was referred to only as Mr. Chappell in the 1926 Robert Sterling Graves newspaper article. However, if he also served the Milton Baptist Church, his name may have been L. N. Chapell:


Name possibly Leroy Norcross Chappell

Find A Grave Memorial
_______________

The Milton Baptist Church was admitted to the Beulah Association in 1843. There are records from 1891 until today. Pastors who served from then until today include: John McDonald, J. R. Jones, James Armstrong, L. N. Chapell, R. J. Bateman, J. J. Adams, L. M. Holloway, J. J. Faulkner, C. W. Reed, Henry T. Allison, J. F. Davis, J. A. Hackney, R. W. Prevost, Hugh L. Nichols.

Source: Milton Baptist Church (Caswell County, North Carolina).
_______________

1880 United States Federal Census
Name: Leroy N. Chappell
Age: 20
Birth Year: abt 1860
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1880: Forestville, Wake, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Son
Marital Status: Single
Father's Name: Leroy Chappell
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Name: Eliza J. Chappell
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Occupation: Student
Household Members: Name Age
Leroy Chappell 58
Eliza J. Chappell 48
Leroy N. Chappell 20
Arthur H. Chappell 17

1900 United States Federal Census
Name: Leroy W Chappell
Age: 48
Birth Date: Apr 1860
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1900: Milton, Caswell, North Carolina [Caswell]
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Mary E Chappell
Marriage Year: 1889
Years Married: 11
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: Massachusetts
Occupation: Minister
Household Members: Name Age
Leroy W Chappell 48
Mary E Chappell 39
Elliner Chappell 10
Roy Chappell 8

1910 United States Federal Census
Name: Leroy N Chappell
Age in 1910: 50 [53] 
Birth Year: abt 1857 [1860] 
Birthplace: North Carolina [South Carolina] 
Home in 1910: Easley, Pickens, South Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Occupation: Minister, Baptist Church
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Mary E Chappell
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: Massachusetts
Household Members: Name Age
Leroy N Chappell 50 [53] 
Mary E Chappell 49
Olea Jno N Chappell 21
Laroy N Chappell Jr. 18

1920 United States Federal Census
Name: Leroy N Chappell
Age: 59
Birth Year: abt 1861
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1920: Guyton, Effingham, Georgia
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Mary E Chappell
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: Massachusetts [North Carolina] 
Home Owned: Rent
Able to Read: Yes
Able to Write: Yes
Occupation: Minister, Church
Household Members: Name Age
Leroy N Chappell 59
Mary E Chappell 57
Eleanor N Chappell 30



Here is a record with respect to another North Carolina Baptist minister named Chappell:

1. William J. Chappell Rev., born abt 1813 in Surry County, NC; died abt 1885 in , Wilkes County, NC; buried in Duncan-Estep Cemetery, Wilkes County, NC. He married (1) on 23 Jan 1836 in , Surry County, NC Mary Swaim, born abt 1815 in, Surry County, NC; died abt 1866 in , Wilkes County, NC; (2) in 1867 in , Wilkes County, NC Rhoda Jane Estep, born 1 Dec 1830 in Wilkes County, NC; died 18 Sep 1900 in Ashe County, NC; buried in Bauguess Cemetery, Ashe County, NC, daughter of Jacob Estep and Nancy Moore.

Notes for William J. Chappell Rev.
Source for William J. Chappell: Mr. Marion V. Bowman, 293 Bear Track Road, Campbellsville, KY 42718.

William J. Chappell was a Baptist minister. He is also listed as the bondsman in several Surry County marriages.
_______________

9. Charles Alexander Guard Thomas (served before 1926) [lived 1857-1925]

It is possible that Reverend Charles A. G. Thomas was serving at the Yanceyville Baptist Church in 1888. The following is from When the Past Refused to Die: A History of Caswell County North Carolina 1777-1977, William S. Powell (1977) 269-272:

The prices that farmers received for their produce were low during the period after the war and the freight rates they had to pay were excessively high. Few farmers had any money left at the end of the year after their bills were paid, in fact many of them went deeper and deeper into debt.

In Texas in 1879 a group of people in similar circumstances formed the Farmers' State Alliance and it spread rapidly in the South, absorbing similar but smaller organizations. Created as a means of enabling rural people to help themselves financially and politically, the Farmers' State Alliance sponsored cooperative business enterprises as a means of reducing the cost of fertilizer, machinery, and other farm necessities. It also served as a means of channeling the political strength of its members. The Alliance entered North Carolina from the South and was organized on a county basis in Robeson, Rockingham, and Wake counties in 1887. Late that year the North Carolina Farmers' State Alliance was formed, and between March 20 and August 14, 1888, there were 17 alliances formed in Caswell County.

Apparently the first Alliance meeting in the county was held on May 7, 1888, at the courthouse. The Caswell News was adopted as the official organ of the body, and the masthead of the next issue read: The Caswell News, And Alliance Advocate. George Williamson was elected president of Caswell County Alliance No. 756. Other officials were R. S. Mitchell, vice president, F. A. Pierson, secretary, B. S. Graves, treasurer, T. H. Walker, lecturer, R. M. McCrary, assistant lecturer, and the Rev. C. A. G. Thomas, chaplain. At the organizational meeting delegates were present from Country Line, Eastland, Gentleman's Ridge, Hightower's, Leasburg, New Hope, Piney Grove, Pelham, Red House, Ridgeville, Stoney Creek, Oliver's, and Yanceyville Alliances.
_______________

After Mr. Mundy left Warrenton the Rev. C. A. G. Thomas, from Portsmouth, became pastor of the Baptist Church [of Warrenton, North Carolina]. Mr. Thomas was well equipped from Richmond College, a close student, very zealous and an excellent preacher. His sermons were examples of gospel simplicity, and fine literary culture punctuated with apt quotations and practical illustrations. His war upon modern customs and habits, especially that of the new dances, was unrelenting, and with those who engaged in the pastime and their sympathizers he became unpopular. He knew no compromise with what he regarded as sinful. His voice was soft and tender and sympathetic. He remained with the church only eleven months.

Mr. Thomas was succeeded by the present incumbent, Rev. Thomas Jerome Taylor, who came to take charge of the Baptist Church and to reside in Warrenton in March, 1885. Mr. Taylor was born in Charlotte, North Carolina, and educated at Furman University. He was called to Warrenton from the church in Darlington, South Carolina, the only other charge of his whole ministry. During the thirty­nine years that Mr. Taylor has resided in Warrenton he has endeared himself to the members of his church, and to the community at large, as few men have done. His daily life has been simple, unselfish, faithful; his highest purpose has been to serve his fellow man, for his heart goes out in tender sympathy to all of God's children.

Source: Montgomery, Lizzie Wilson; Sketches of old Warrenton, North Carolina; Traditions and Reminiscences of the Town and People Who Made It, Raleigh, Edwards & Broughton printing company, 1924.
_______________

Third Baptist Church of Raleigh, North Carolina. Rev C A G Thomas, pastor. 1887.

Thus, it appears that in 1985 C. A. G. Thomas was serving a the Baptist Church of Warrenton, and in 1887 at the Third Baptist Church of Raleigh. When he served as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville is not known. However, it would have been before 1926 and could have included 1888 (see above).
_______________

 U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 (Beta)
Name: C A G Thomas
Gender: M (Male)
Spouse: Hallie R Thomas
Publication Title: Hill's Rocky Mount (North Carolina) City Directory

U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 (Beta)
Name: Chas A G Rev Thomas
Gender: M (Male)
Residence Year: 1913
Residence Place: Salisbury; Spencer, North Carolina
Occupation: Pastor
Spouse: Hallie R Thomas
Publication Title: Salisbury=Spencer, N.C. City Directory

1870 United States Federal Census
Name: Charles A Thomas
Age in 1870: 13
Birth Year: abt 1857
Birthplace: Virginia
Home in 1870: Portsmouth Jefferson Ward, Norfolk, Virginia
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Portsmouth
Household Members: Name Age
Philip G Thomas 46
Sarah V Thomas 35
John J Thomas 17
Charles A Thomas 13
Susan V Thomas 3
George W Evans 15

1880 United States Federal Census
Name: Charles A. G. Thomas
Age: 23
Birth Year: abt 1857
Birthplace: Virginia
Home in 1880: Portsmouth, Norfolk, Virginia
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Son
Marital Status: Single
Father's Name: Philip G. Thomas
Father's Birthplace: Virginia
Mother's Name: Virginia Thomas
Mother's Birthplace: Virginia
Occupation: Minister Of The Gospel
Household Members: Name Age
Philip G. Thomas 56
Virginia Thomas 46
Charles A. G. Thomas 23
Susan V. Thomas 13
Arthur G. Thomas 5

1900 United States Federal Census
Name: Charles E T Thomas [Charles T Thomas] 
Age: 43
Birth Date: Mar 1857
Birthplace: Virginia
Home in 1900: Thomasville, Davidson, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Hallie R Thomas
Marriage Year: 1889
Years Married: 11
Father's Birthplace: Virginia
Mother's Birthplace: Virginia
Occupation: Preacher
Household Members: Name Age
Charles E T Thomas 43
Hallie R Thomas 28
Hunter M C Thomas 13
Philip J Thomas 8
Jeter B Thomas 6
Charles H G Thomas 4
Robt V Thomas 2

1910 United States Federal Census
Name: Chas A G Thomas
Age in 1910: 53
Birth Year: 1857
Birthplace: Virginia
Home in 1910: Lower Creek, Caldwell, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Hallie R Thomas
Father's Birthplace: Virginia
Mother's Birthplace: Virginia
Household Members: Name Age
Chas A G Thomas 53
Hallie R Thomas 39
Jeter B Thomas 16
Robt V Thomas 12
Julian H Thomas 9

1920 United States Federal Census
Name: Charles A Thomas
Age: 62
Birth Year: abt 1858
Birthplace: Virginia
Home in 1920: River Bend, Gaston, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Hallie Thomas
Father's Birthplace: Virginia
Mother's Birthplace: Virginia
Home Owned: Rent
Able to read: Yes
Able to Write: Yes
Household Members: Name Age
Charles A Thomas 62
Hallie Thomas 49
Julian Thomas 18

North Carolina, Death Certificates, 1909-1975
Name: Charles Alexander Guard Thomas
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age: 68
Birth Date: 7 Nov 1857
Birth Place: Portsmouth, Virginia, United States
Death Date: 30 Nov 1925
Death Location: Rocky Mount, Nash
Spouse's Name: Haller R Thomas
Father's Name: Philip G Thomas
Mother's Name: Sara Spaulding

North Carolina, Death Collection, 1908-2004
Name: Charles A Thomas
Age: 68
Date of Birth: 1857
Date of Death: 30 Nov 1925
Death County: Nash
Death State: North Carolina
Source Vendor: NC State Archives. North Carolina Deaths, 1908-67
_______________

10. Oscar Alonzo (lived 1877-1950)

Oscar Alonzo Keller purportedly served as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville (Yanceyville, Caswell County, North Carolina). Church records do not show his pastoral term. However, according to the history of Trinity Baptist Church, "Mr. O. A. Keller, called as pastor in 1907, served one year." Trinity Baptist Church and the Yanceyville Baptist Church had a history of sharing ministers. Whether Oscar Alonzo Keller served at the Yanceyville Baptist Church for one year beginning in 1907 is not known. However, assuming such would be reasonable.

Alexander W. Biddle Weds Elizabeth Simms; Ceremony for Bryn Mawr Youth and Garden City, L. I., Girl Is Performed in the South: The Rev. O. A. Keller, Jonesboro minister, said tonight that he had performed a marriage last Tuesday for Alexander W. Biddle, 18 years old, of Bryn Mawr, Pa., and Miss Elizabeth Simms, also 18, of Garden City, L. I.

Source: New York Times (9 Apr 1937).
_______________

Rocky River Baptist - 1757 - O. A. Keller, Jonesboro: Located in Siler City, near the headwaters of Rocky River.  Organized in 1757. There was one other building before the present one, built of hewn logs.  It was dedicated/consecrated in 1760. The church was rebuilt in 1848 of wood. There is no bell or bell tower. The first clergyman was Rev. James Savage, whose tenure was 20 years. No records of published church history known.

Mt. Gilead Baptist - 1824: Mt. Gilead Baptist Church, located in Pittsboro, was organized in 1824. There was one church before the present one. The present church built in 1900. It is a wooden church, 30" X 50", wooden, with a balcony, well furnished and seated, with a bell and organ. Rev. O. C. Keller was the first Pastor, his tenure was 8 years. No written records of Minutes, Baptism, Marriages, Death or Burial records for the church exist.  Church was built on ground donated by Joshua Hackney, in 1820. The members are all planters and in good financial standing in the community.  Rev. R. R. Gordon, is the present pastor.

Rives Chapel Baptist - 1832 - O.A. Keller, Jonesboro: Located in Pittsboro. Organized in 1832. The present building, which is the second one, was dedicated in 1930. It is made of brick 30' X 50'. The first clergyman was  David Hackney, who started preaching at the age of 65 years. (He had been a member of the legislature from Chatham co., in 1830-1836. T.Y. Seymore was the pastor from 1920 to 1930.  In 1930 Rev. C.A. Doud, became pastor, whose tenure was 14 years. There are no vital records kept for this church, only financial records.  The church grounds were donated by Simeon Rives, one of the charter members and he endowed the church with $1000 at his death.

Source: Chatham County, North Carolina Churches.
_______________

Moncure Baptist Church History
Chatham County, North Carolina

In January, 1914, the building committee reported the purchase of the present church site. By February 1, 1914, a building plan had been decided upon. In July, actual construction of the building began. The Rev. R. R. Gordon, pastor, conducted the first revival services in the new building in September, 1914. On the first Sunday in May, 1915, C. B. Crutchfield, D. D. Thomas, and J. H. Churchill were elected the first deacons. These men were ordained by Rev. W. B. Woff and D. Dodson Poe in July, 1915. Under Rev. Woff's guidance and leadership, the church grew in membership and the debt was paid. The church was dedicated May 4, 1918. Walter U. Johnson preached the dedication sermon and membership had grown to one hundred seven.

Following Rev. Woff as pastor were: R. H. Williams, R. R. Gordon (supply), Jessie Blalock, T. Y. Seymore, George Griffin, O. A. Keller, Edward Humphrey (later a missionary to Nigeria), J. L. Walter Moose, Julius Corpening, V. W. Parrish, Robert Mobley, Asa Blount, George H. Hill, Darden Battle, Gene Moore. Dr. John Wayland had always come to our rescue in the capacity of interim pastor in times of crisis.

Source: Moncure Baptist Church History.
_______________

Pastors Who Have Served Union Hill Baptist Church (Clemmons, North Carolina: O. A. Keller 1916-1917

Source: Union Hill Bapist Church History.
_______________

1900 United States Federal Census
Name: Oscar A Kellar
Age: 22
Birth Date: Jun 1877
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1900: Ellendale, Alexander, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Iva M Kellar
Marriage Year: 1900
Years Married: 0
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Household Members: Name Age
Oscar A Kellar 22
Iva M Kellar 19

1910 United States Federal Census
Name: Oscar A Kelley [Oscar A Keller] 
Age in 1910: 32
Birth Year: 1878
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1910: Abbotts Creek, Davidson, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Ida M Kelley
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Occupation: Minister 
Household Members: Name Age
Oscar A Kelley 32
Ida M Kelley 28
Grace T Kelley 9
J Lois Kelley 7
Carey J Kelley 3

1920 United States Federal Census
Name: Oscar A Keller
Age: 43
Birth Year: abt 1877
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1920: Aberdeen, Moore, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Iva M Keller
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Home Owned: Rent
Able to read: Yes
Able to Write: Yes
Occupation: Minister, Baptist Church
Household Members: Name Age
Oscar A Keller 43
Iva M Keller 38
Carey Keller 13
Hellen B Keller 6

1930 United States Federal Census
Name: Oscar A Keller
Gender: Male
Birth Year: abt 1878
Birthplace: North Carolina
Race: White
Home in 1930: Jonesboro, Lee, North Carolina
Marital Status: Married
Relation to Head of House: Head
Spouse's Name: Iva M Keller
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Household Members: Name Age
Oscar A Keller 52
Iva M Keller 48 [43] 
Clay J Keller 22
Helen B Keller 16
Oscar A Keller 9

World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918
Name: Oscar A Keller
County: Moore
State: North Carolina
Birth Date: 12 Jun 1877
Race: White
FHL Roll Number: 1765691

North Carolina, Death Collection, 1908-2004
Name: Oscar A Sr. Keller
Race: White
Age: 73
Date of Birth: 1877
Date of Death: 22 Jun 1950
Death County: Lee
Death State: North Carolina
Source Vendor: NC State Archives. North Carolina Deaths, 1908-67

North Carolina, Death Certificates, 1909-1975
Name: Rev. Oscar A Keller Sr.
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age: 73
Birth Date: 13 Jun 1877
Birth Place: Alexander
Death Date: 22 Jun 1950
Death Location: Jonesboro Hgts, Lee
Father's Name: James Keller
Mother's name: Mary Roberson
Residence: Jonesboro Hgts, Lee, North Carolina
_______________

Jonesboro Cemetery
Jonesboro, Lee County, North Carolina

Rev. Oscar A. Keller
June 12 1877 - June 22 1950
h/o Iva Oxford Keller

Iva Oxford Keller
June 8 1881 - June 25 1974
w/o Rev. Oscar A. Keller

11. D. W. Overby

Worship services have been held on a regular basis for 154 years at Kerr's Chapel except for the winter on 1918 and 1919. During these months a deadly Spanish influenza epidemic swept the area, and public meetings, including church services, were prohibited by law. Reverend D. W. Overby held many funerals in the church yard. Many of the dates of death on the headstones in the cemetery read 1918 or 1919.

History of Kerr's Chapel Baptist Church (Caswell County, North Carolina).
_______________

Purportedly served as pastor at the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville (Yanceyville, Caswell County, North Carolina), term of service unknown.
_______________

Was pastor at Kerr's Chapel Baptist Church (Caswell County, North Carolina) as early as 1911.

Source: The State Dispatch (Burlington, North Carolina), 26 July 1911).

 The following is from In the Beginning . . . The Churches of Caswell County, Jean B. Scott, Compiler (2000) at 110:

"Rev. D. W. Overby was called in 1910 and served until 1922 when the church [Trinity Baptist Church] was without a pastor for a year."
_______________

U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 (Beta)
Name: D W Rev Overby
Residence Year: 1932
Street Address: 418 Walnut
Residence Place: Reidsville, North Carolina
Occupation: Pastor
Publication Title: Hill's Reidsville (North Carolina) City Directory

U.S. WWII Draft Cards Young Men, 1898-1929
Name: Reverend D W Overby
Residence: Reidsville, North Carolina
Registration Year: 1942
Household Members: Name
Charles Alvis Griffith
D W Overby
_______________

12. Claudius Murat Murchison (served 1911-1918) [lived 1858-1922]

Claudius Murat Murchison (1858-1922)

Murchison Family

Murchison Grave Marker

(for larger image, click on photograph, then click "Actions/View all Sizes")
_______________

In 1916, Claudius Murat Murchison was serving as pastor at the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville (Yanceyville, Caswell County, North Carolina). His term of service is believed to be 1911-1918.
_______________

Claudius Murat Murchison was born May 22, 1858, in Moore County, North Carolina, to DC Murchison and Martha Hackney Murchison.  His mother died when Claudius was four years old. Claudius is 2 years old in the 1860 Census, living with his parents in the St. Lawrence Township, Chatham Co., NC.  In the 1870 Census he is 12 and attending school.  The family is living in the Gulf Township, Chatham Co., NC.  The 1880 Census lists Claudius as being 22 years old, a farm worker, and living with his parents in Gulf, NC. In 1878 and 1884, he was elected as a messenger to attend the Sandy Creek Association for Bethany Baptist Church.  Sensing a call to the gospel ministry, Claudius requested to be ordained. Following the procedure of ordination among Southern Baptists, Bethany called an ordaining  presbytery to examine Claudius as to his call and doctrinal beliefs.  The presbytery, which consisted of Rev. M. Baldwin, O.T. Edwards, W.G. King, W.H.H. Lawhorn, and J.W. Stallings, recommended Claudius to Bethany Bapist for ordination.

Claudius is considered a pioneer Baptist preacher.  About 1884, as a missionary under the State Board, he came to South Fork Baptist Association and preached at Warlick's and Mountain Grove churches.  On January 30, 1886, he married Alice Penelope Temple, a Greensboro College graduate who was described as an "educational enthusiast."  Claudius brought his bride to the area west of Hickory where he was preaching.  In a little clearing in the wilderness, they established an academy and a community post office.  Claudius named the place Penelope in honor of his wife.

Claudius began holding worship services in the academy, and Warlick's organized a mission there as a branch of their church.  On October 19, 1888, an independent church, Penelope Baptist, was born with 45 charter members.  Rev. Murchison served as the first pastor until April, 1891, and he would accept the call to the pastorate of Penelope three more times, serving the church in 1892-1895, 1899-1900, and 1902.  He was always very busy in his work for the Lord: in education, in the growth of the church, in evangelistic work, and in guiding the young people of his day.   As a pastor's wife, teacher, post-mistress, and mother, during a time when when women were not actively supported for "speaking out, taking part, and being heard," Penelope was caught up in the work Claudius had begun.

In two letters dated July26 and July 31,1890, Rev. DC Murchison  wrote to loved ones in Gulf about traveling by rail to Penelope and the prospects for "Claud's" academy. 

In 1897 Penelope Academy, listing 80 students from seven counties, was considered a "leading preparatory school for boys and girls."  Nontheless, the academy's days were numbered, as local communities would soon begin to fund free public graded schools.  Claudius wrote in The Baptist Worker in 1899 of his work in the area west of Hickory in the 1880s and 1890s.  Besides Penelope, he held many other pastorates, but the details are not totally clear.  The South Forks history, written in 1901, lists him as "presently serving at Mount Holly, preaching twice a month," and names other pastorates as Catawba, Kid's Chapel and Thessolonica.  The history further reads  that he has "done considerable missionary work; one of our best preachers; a safe, consecrated, level-headed man; a valuable workman in advancing the Master's cause."

Penelope's niece recalled that "Uncle Claudius had a good appearance, neat, appropriate for a minister.  He wore a dark suit, white shirt. black tie, hat and shoes.  He had a mustache.  He was considered by my mother and other students at the Penelope Academy as being strict and stern in discipline.  He taught practical religious principles which he expected to be obeyed.  When he and his family visited in our home, he conducted long family devotions, reading from Biblical passages, followed by lengthy prayers.  These were usually after the evening meal before we could begin our school home work and get ready for bed.  He emphasized we obey our teachers, parents, shun evil and strive to observe and possess the 'fruits of the Spirit.'  Drinking alcoholic beverages and playing cards were not to be done."  

At home with Penelope in Ridgecrest, Claudius died at night on April 21, 1922.  Penelope dressed him and waited for the day to come. It was a beautiful spring morning and the birds were singing.  Morning was a special time for Claudius and Penelope; they often enjoyed early morning walks. Charily and Children, an in-house publication of Baptist Children's Homes, reported on Claudius' death:

The death of Rev. C. M. Murchison marks the passing of one of the most useful of our pastors. He was a graduate of Wake Forest College, and in his early days did school work along with his preaching.  He had charge of Penelope Academy in Catawba County for some years.  He served churches in Lincoln County, NC.  In later years he served churches at Yanceyville, doing there a splendid work, and was a leader in the work in the Beulah Association.  The school called him again and he took charge of the school at Bakersville.  Going back into the pastorate he went to Magnolia Street Church, Greensboro, NC.  In the midst of promising work there he was stricken down.  This was more than a year ago.  Since then he has lingered on the margin till last Saturday morning the silent boatman called for him at Ridgecrest (NC) and carried him over to the other side.  He was a great friend to the Orphanage.  We shall miss him. (April 29, 1922)

Penelope died in Chapel Hill in 1931.  She is buried alongside Claudius in the City Cemetery, Marion, North Carolina. The above portrait of Rev. Murchison and his family hangs in Penelope Baptist Church, which celebrated her first hundred years in 1988.  Left to right: Carl, Rev. Claudius, Donald, Penelope, Claudius Temple.

Source: C. M. Murchison
_______________

Find A Grave Memorial
_______________

See also: Robert Alexander Murchison; Penelope Baptist Church; and Claudius Murat Murchison (1858-1922).
_______________

1860 United States Federal Census
Name: Claudius Murchison
Age in 1860: 2
Birth Year: abt 1858
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1860: Western Division, Chatham, North Carolina
Gender: Male
Post Office: St Lawrence
Household Members: Name Age
Duncan Murchison 35
Martha Murchison 29
Endora Murchison 10
Robt Murchison 8
Sarah Murchison 6
Gustavus Murchison 4
Claudius Murchison 2

1870 United States Federal Census
Name: Claudius Marckeson [Claudius Murchison] 
Age in 1870: 12
Birth Year: abt 1858
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1870: Gulf, Chatham, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Grove
Household Members: Name Age
Duncan Marckeson 45
Lydia Marckeson 40
Robert Marckeson 19
Sarah Marckeson 17
Gustavus Marckeson 15
Claudius Marckeson 12
Haney Marckeson 5
Calvin Marckeson 2

1900 United States Federal Census
Name: Claudius Murchison
Age: 42
Birth Date: May 1858
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1900: Icard, Burke, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Allice T Murchison
Marriage Year: 1886
Years Married: 14
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Household Members: Name Age
Claudius Murchison 42
Allice T Murchison 48
Donald R Murchison 12
Carl T Murchison 11
Claudius A Murchison 10

1910 United States Federal Census
Name: Claudius Murchison
Age in 1910: 50
Birth Year: 1860
Birthplace: Georgia
Home in 1910: Militia District 102, Hancock, Georgia
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Allace Murchison
Father's Birthplace: Georgia
Mother's Birthplace: Georgia
Household Members: Name Age
Claudius Murchison 50
Allace Murchison 51
Carl A Murchison 22
Claudius Murchison Jr. 21

1920 United States Federal Census
Name: Claudius Murchisone [Claudius Murchison] 
Age: 61
Birth Year: abt 1859
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1920: Bakersville, Mitchell, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Alice Murchisone
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Home Owned: Rent
Able to read: Yes
Able to Write: Yes
Occupation: Baptist Clergyman 
Household Members: Name Age
Claudius Murchisone 61
Alice Murchisone 62

U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 (Beta)
Name: Claudius M Rev Murchison
Gender: M (Male)
Residence Year: 1921
Street Address: Summit av nr Bessemer av
Residence Place: Greensboro, North Carolina
Occupation: Pastor
Spouse: Alice Murchison
Publication Title: Greensboro, N.C. City Directory Including Proximity, Revolution, and White Oak Mills

North Carolina, Death Certificates, 1909-1975
Name: Claudius Marial Murchison
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age: 63
Birth Date: 22 May 1858
Birth Place: North Carolina, United States
Death Date: 29 Apr 1922
Death Location: Black Mountain;Ridgecrest, Buncombe
Spouse's Name: A P T Murchison
Father's Name: D C Murchison
Mother's name: Martha Hockey

North Carolina, Death Collection, 1908-2004
Name: Claudius M Murchison
Race: White
Age: 63
Date of Birth: 1859
Date of Death: 29 Apr 1922
Death County: Buncombe
Death State: North Carolina
Source Vendor: NC State Archives. North Carolina Deaths, 1908-67

See: http://dcmurchison.pbworks.com/w/page/17018271/Robert%20Alexander%20Murchison
_______________

13. John Albert Hackney (served 1920) [lived 1867-1928]



In the early part of 1908 the State Baptist Mission Board employed Rev. John. A. Hackney, grandfather of Oselle Andrews Bradshaw, to pastorate the field of churches surrounding the Northern section of Alamance County. Rev. Hackney was called as pastor of Glencoe Baptist Church on March 8, 1908. His ministry was very brief and on April 10, 1909, Rev. W. E. Dunnegan replaced him as pastor. However, Rev. Hackney later returned to Glencoe in 1925 to serve for a second time as pastor of the Baptist Church.
_______________

Apparently was pastor at the Glencoe Baptist Church (Glencoe, North Carolina) in 1925-1927 and at some time served as pastor at the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville (Yanceyville, Caswell County, North Carolina). When the 1920 census was taken, John Albert Hackney was enumerated as a fifty-four-year-old Baptist minister living in Yanceyville, North Carolina. Thus, one reasonably could assume he was serving as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville. He also served at the Milton Baptist Church in and/or after 1891.
_______________

The Milton Baptist Church was admitted to the Beulah Association in 1843. There are records from 1891 until today. Pastors who served from then until today include: John McDonald, J. R. Jones, James Armstrong, L. N. Chapell, R. J. Bateman, J. J. Adams, L. M. Holloway, J. J. Faulkner, C. W. Reed, Henry T. Allison, J. F. Davis, J. A. Hackney, R. W. Prevost, Hugh L. Nichols.

Source: Milton Baptist Church (Caswell County, North Carolina).
______________

1900 United States Federal Census
Name: John Hackney
Age: 35
Birth Date: Apr 1865
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1900: Gilmer, Guilford, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Rachel Hackney
Marriage Year: 1888
Years Married: 12
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Household Members: Name Age
John Hackney 35
Rachel Hackney 36
Lula Hackney 11
Sallie Hackney 8
Ila Hackney 4
Guy M Hackney 2
Annie Hackney 1

1910 United States Federal Census
Name: John A Hackney
Age in 1910: 45
Birth Year: 1865
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1910: Durham Ward 3, Durham, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Rachael Hackney
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Household Members: Name Age
John A Hackney 45
Rachael Hackney 45
Lula Hackney 21
Sallie Hackney 19
Ilas Hackney 15
Mike Hackney 13
Annie Hackney 11
Josie Hackney 9 [8] 
George Hackney 7
Paul Hackney 5
Ruben L Bladock 27
Pearl Bladock 19
Hubert York 25
May York 22
Annie Brady 24

1920 United States Federal Census
Name: John A Hackney
Age: 54
Birth Year: abt 1866
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1920: Yanceyville, Caswell, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Rachel Hackney
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Home Owned: Rent
Able to read: Yes
Able to Write: Yes
Occupation: Clergyman, Baptist Church
Household Members: Name Age
John A Hackney 54
Rachel Hackney 54
Sallie M Hackney 27
Josie Hackney 18
George Hackney 16
Paul Hackney 14
Wyona Williams 22

Find A Grave Memorial

North Carolina, Death Certificates, 1909-1975
Name: Rev John Albert Hackney
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age: 61
Birth Date: 10 Apr 1867
Birth Place: North Carolina, United States
Death Date: 4 Aug 1928
Death Location: Bhnrae, Alamance
Spouse's Name: Mrs Rachel Hackney
Father's Name: Albert Hackney
Mother's name: Luiza Terry

North Carolina, Death Collection, 1908-2004
Name: John A Hackney
Age: 61
Date of Birth: 1867
Date of Death: 4 Aug 1928
Death County: Alamance
Death State: North Carolina
Source Vendor: NC State Archives. North Carolina Deaths, 1908-67
_______________

14. Robert Ward Prevost (1922–1925)

Robert Ward Prevost (1890-1980)

1. Robert Ward Prevost (1922-1925)

Robert Ward Prevost (1922-1925)

(for larger image, click on photograph, then click "Actions/View all Sizes")
_______________

Served as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville (Yanceyville, Caswell County, North Carolina) 1922-1925, and at the Milton Baptist Church (Milton, Caswell County, North Carolina).

The Milton Baptist Church was admitted to the Beulah Association in 1843. There are records from 1891 until today. Pastors who served from then until today include: John McDonald, J. R. Jones, James Armstrong, L. N. Chapell, R. J. Bateman, J. J. Adams, L. M. Holloway, J. J. Faulkner, C. W. Reed, Henry T. Allison, J. F. Davis, J. A. Hackney, R. W. Prevost, Hugh L. Nichols.

Source: Milton Baptist Church (Caswell County, North Carolina).
_______________

North Carolina, Birth and Death Indexes, 1800-2000
Name: Robert Ward Prevost
Event Type: delayedbirth
Birth Date: 20 Nov 1890
Birth County: Davidson
Roll Number: NCVR_BD_C032_68001
Volume: 7
Page: 64

1910 United States Federal Census
Name: Robbert W Prevost
Age in 1910: 19
Birth Year: 1891
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1910: Emmons, Davidson, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Son
Marital Status: Single
Father's Name: Andrew W Prevost
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's name: Nancy L Prevost 
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Household Members: Name Age
Andrew W Prevost 62
Nancy L Prevost 58
Robbert W Prevost 19

World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918
Name: Robert Ward Prevost
County: Randolph
State: North Carolina
Birthplace: North Carolina;United States of America
Birth Date: 20 Nov 1890
Race: Caucasian (White)
FHL Roll Number: 1765931

1920 United States Federal Census
Name: Robt Prevost
Age: 29 
Birth Year: abt 1891
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1920: Asheboro, Randolph, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Minnie Prevost
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Home Owned: Own
Able to read: Yes
Able to Write: Yes
Household Members: Name Age
Robt Prevost 29 
Minnie Prevost 21
Brice Prevost 2 [2 9/12] 
Gibbs Prevost 1 [1 3/12]

1940 United States Federal Census
Name: Robert W Prevost
Age: 49
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1891
Gender: Male
Race: White
Birthplace: North Carolina
Marital Status: Married
Relation to Head of House: Head
Home in 1940: Knox, Tennessee
Street: Jacksboro Pike
House Number: 116
Farm: No
Inferred Residence in 1935: Andrews, Cherokee, North Carolina
Residence in 1935: Andrews, Cherokee, North Carolina
Resident on farm in 1935: No
Sheet Number: 4B
Number of Household in Order of Visitation: 84
Occupation: Church Minister
Household Members: Name Age
Robert W Prevost 49
Minnie D Prevost 41
Gibbs M Prevost 21
Nancy L Prevost 15
Babby W Prevost 11
Martha D Prevost 0
James B Prevost 22
Edith M Prevost 22

Social Security Death Index
Name: Robert Prevost 
SSN: 412-58-1717
Last Residence: 37760  Jefferson City, Jefferson, Tennessee, United States of America
Born: 20 Nov 1890
Died: Oct 1980
State (Year) SSN issued: Tennessee (1954)
_______________

15. C. W. Hood (1925–1927) (resigned December 1927)

There is a photograph of "a" Reverend C. W. Hood (seated at the head of the table). Thanksgiving 1945. Location unknown. To right is son of Reverend C. W. Hood. Posted by grandson Charles Hood to the Antelope Valley College (California) Blog. Is this the Reverend C. W. Hood who was pastor at the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville 1925-1927? No more is known about this photograph.


_______________

Reverend C. W. Hood served as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Yanceyville (Caswell County, North Carolina) 1925-1927). Whether any of the following is with respect to this C. W. Hood is unknown:

Claude Whitfield Hood, born 17 February 1869 in Georgia, son of a minister.
_______________

The Newnan Herald, Friday, April 10, 1925
Newnan, Cowetta County, Georgia

Some Baptist History---Providence Church

Providence Church was constituted Jan 26, 1835, with 12 members. Ministers present were Rev. Ben Holmes, Rev. Moses Kelly, and Rev. John G Fry. It was first located 5 miles west from Newnan on the Carrollton Road. The second location was on the same road, nearer Newnan, the third location was on Franklin Road, near the Elias Summers’s home; and its present location is at Welcome, near the E. M. Grimes home.

Rev. J. G. Fry served as pastor until 1841; Rev James Davis till 1843; Rev. James Banks till 1845. Levi Newton was clerk, and W. Collier and Thos Scroggins were deacons.

Rev. Robert Fleming was pastor 4 years, Rev. John M. Key 11 years, Rev. J. H. Hall 2 years, Rev. R. H. Jackson 7 years, Rev. T. N. Rhodes 2 years, Rev. J. R. T. Brown, 5 years, Rev. W. W. Kelley 1 year, Rev. R. E. Pitman 1 year, Rev. E. B. Barrett 5 years, Rev. J. B. Dodd ? years, Rev. C. W. Hood, 2 years, Rev. W. E. Fuller 6 years, Rev. F. J. Amis 24 years. Sixteen pastors served 90 years. The average increase by baptism per year has been about five.

The church has the distinction of furnishing one foreign missionary worker in the person of Miss Mattie Vie Summer, who since Aug 17, 1920, has been serving as missionary in china.

If practicable I would gladly say a work of each of the splendid men and women who have had and have membership in Providence church. Of those living a word of encouragement to a closer walk with God.

Note---Many years ago, White Oak church enjoyed the services, efficient and constant of Bro Sims, father of Mrs. J. W. Bowers of Newnan. In 1920, Rev. W. E. Yeargan was pastor at Bethlehem and Rev. B. E. Kelley was pastor of Ebenezer church. I hope I will be pardoned for these and other omissions that may occur.

F. J. Amis.
_______________

Reedy Creek Baptist Church
Marion County, South Carolina

Following the pastorate of Rev. Lide, Rev. K. BARNES was called who served for three years, and he was followed in 1893 by Rev. W. T. TATE. Rev. Tate's pastorate was a short one - only one year - and he was followed by Rev. W. A. HUMPHRIES. Rev. Humphries served the church for four years and was followed by Rev. A. T. ROGERS in 1900 who served for two years. Rev. Rogers contributed greatly to the progress of the church and upon his resignation, he recommended to the church Rev. C. W. HOOD, a seminary class mate, whom the church called as pastor.

Rev. Hood served the church upon three different occasions. He began his first pastorate here in the year 1903 and served for three years. During that pastorate a new church building was erected in 1904. It was also during this time that the W.M.S. was organized in 1903. Mrs. C.W. HOOD was the first president. Mrs. Hood became an active W.M.U. worker in the Association, assisting in the organization of societies of Gapway and Little Bethel churches and promoting the organization of Y.W.A.'s, Sunbeam Bands, and R. A. Chapters in some of these churches.

Rev. Hood was followed in 1907 by Rev. J. A. MASON who served for two years, at the close of which Rev. A. T. ROGERS was called to serve the church for the second time. Rev. Rogers served for only about a year this time and was followed by Rev. J. M. CULBERTSON who also served for one year. Rev. Hood returned to the church as pastor for the second time in the 1914 and served for four years. He was followed in 1919 by Rev. W. L. BRITT who served for one year, and then in 1920 Rev. G. C. HEDGEPATH was called. During his pastorate the church went forward in every phase of its work and came to be recognized as one of the leading rural churches of the state.

Source: Reedy Creek Baptist Church
_______________

16. Paul Thomas Worrell (1928–1944) (served until May 1944) [lived 1903-1999]



Paul Thomas Worrell (1903-1999)

The following is from In the Beginning . . . The Churches of Caswell County, Jean B. Scott, Compiler (2000) at 110:

On the 5th of February 1840 Calvin Graves gave a Note of Obligation to William Slade, A. Howard, and A. Graves, Gen. Trustees, for one acre of land for building a church. On January 3rd. 1842, a deed of 1.18 acres and a right-of-way to "Meeting House Spring" situated northwest of the property was given to the same Trustees. The deed was duly registered in court on Feb. 15, 1842. Both of these papers are in existence. A. Graves Thompson was Clerk for some years when his family was young, and his son Azariah Graves Thompson, Jr., was baptized there about 1928. The entire family attended services there until the early 1930s when Reverend Worrell served as pastor. It was then that the Thompson children began to move from home for school and marriage, and Graves Thompson joined Locust Hill Methodist with his wife and other children who were always Methodist.

North Carolina, Birth and Death Indexes, 1800-2000
Name: Paul Thomas Worrell
Event Type: delayedbirth
Birth Date: 18 Mar 1903
Birth County: Northampton
Parent1 Name: George Thomas Worrell
Roll Number: NCVR_B_C071_68001
Volume: 6
Page: 474

1910 United States Federal Census
Name: Pard Warrell [Paul Worrell] 
Age in 1910: 7
Birth Year: 1903
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1910: Seaboard, Northampton, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Son
Marital Status: Single
Father's Name: Geo L Warrell
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's name: Annie Warrell 
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Household Members: Name Age
Geo L Warrell 47
Annie Warrell 32
Roy Warrell 13
Virgie Warrell 11
Ryland Warrell 9
Pard Warrell 7
Benjamin Warrell 3
Parlie M Warrell 2
Mary Spencer 69

1920 United States Federal Census
Name: Danl Worrell [Paul Worrell] 
Age: 17
Birth Year: abt 1903
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1920: Wiccacanee, Northampton, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Son
Marital Status: Single
Father's Name: George J Worrell
Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
Mother's name: Martha A Worrell
Mother's Birthplace: North Carolina
Able to read: Yes
Able to Write: Yes
Household Members: Name Age
George J Worrell 56
Martha A Worrell 42
Roy C Worrell 23
Virginian Worrell 21
Danl Worrell 17
Ben Worrell 13
?Allie M Worrell 11
Odella Worrell 9
George T Worrell 7

1930 United States Federal Census
Name: Paul F Worrell
Gender: Male
Birth Year: abt 1903
Birthplace: North Carolina
Race: White
Home in 1930: Wake Forest, Wake, North Carolina
Marital Status: Married
Relation to Head of House: Head
Spouse's Name: Beatrice M Worrell
Father's Birthplace: Virginia
Mother's Birthplace: Virginia
Household Members: Name Age
Paul F Worrell 27
Beatrice M Worrell 26

U.S. WWII Draft Cards Young Men, 1898-1929
Name: Reverend Paul Thomas Worrell
Race: White
Birth Date: 18 Mar 1903
Birth Place: Northampton County, North Carolina
Residence: Yanceyville, Caswell, North Carolina
Registration Year: 1942
Relationship: Self (Head)
Household Members: Name
Paul Thomas Worrell
P T Worrell

North Carolina, Death Collection, 1908-2004
Name: Paul Thomas Worrell
Gender: Male
Race: White
Hispanic Origin: Non-Hispanic
Marital Status: Married
Social Security Number: 237627295
Father's Last Name: Worrell
Age: 96 Years
Date of Birth: 18 Mar 1903
Birth County: Northampton
Birth State: North Carolina
Residence City: Other
Residence County: Northampton
Residence State: North Carolina
Residence Zip Code: 27876
Education: 2 years of college
Occupation: Clergy
Industry: Religious organizations
Date of Death: 5 Apr 1999
Death City: Wilmington
Death County: New Hanover
Death State: North Carolina
Autopsy: Autopsy Not Performed
Institution: Hospital Inpatient
Hospital Name: Columbia Cape Fear Memorial Hospital
Attendant: Physician
Burial Location: Burial in-state
Recorded Date: 28 Apr 1999
Source Vendor: North Carolina State Center for Health Statistics
_______________

17. William Troy Baucom (1945–1951) (was called December 1944) [lived 1883-1972]



18. T. C. Williams, Jr. (1952–1958)



19. Paul F. Hardy (1959–1963)



20. George M. Bishop (1963–1967)


21. J. Carroll Spivey (1968–1984)



22. Stanley H. Hare (1985–1998)


23. Claude Harrelson (2000–2003)



24. Phillip T. Kelley (2004-2012)


______________

To be researched:

Reverend John Kerr
Dr. H. A. Brown

No comments:

Post a Comment