Friday, December 12, 2008

Old Caswell Academies and Schools

CASWELL COUNTY SCHOOLS

CASWELL ACADEMY.

Legislation. An Act to establish an Academy at the Courthouse in Caswell County:

Whereas, a number of the citizens of said county, are desirous of establishing an Academy for the promotion of learning, at the courthouse aforesaid, having by subscription, erected a convenient building on a lot appropriated to that purpose, and Trustees being already appointed by the Subscribers to carry the same into effect, and it is proper that they should be incorporated, therefore;

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That Thomas Donoho, Solomon Graves, Jesse Carter, Alexander Murphey, David Mitchell, Richard Simpson, Marmaduke Williams, Michael Montgomery, John M'Aden, James Yancey and Henry Atkinson, Esquires shall be, and they are hereby declared to be a body politic and corporate, to be known and distinguished by the name of "The Trustees of the Caswell Academy" and by that name shall have perpetual succession and that they the Trustees, and their successors by the name aforesaid, or a majority of them, shall be able and capable in law, to take, demand, receive and possess all monies, goods and chattels that shall be given for the use of the said Academy, and the same apply according to the will of the donors and by gift, purchase or devise, to take, have, receive, possess and enjoy and retain to them and their successors forever, any lands, rents, tenements, and hereditaments of what kind or nature soever, in special trust and confidence, that the same or the profits thereof, be applied to and for the use and purpose of establishing and endowing said academy.

Chapter XXXVII, Laws 1802.

CASWELL ACADEMY OPENS.

There will be opened in the County of Caswell, near the Courthouse, on the first day of January next, an Academy, known by the Name of the Caswell Academy, for the Reception of Students, to be taught the different Branches of Literature; to wit, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, the Latin and Greek Languages, Geography, Natural and Moral Philosophy, Astronomy, etc., etc., under the direction of the Rev. Hugh Shaw. The Terms for teaching the Latin and Greek Languages, together with the Sciences, will be 14 Dollars per Annum; Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic, 7 Dollars per Annum. Boarding may be procured convenient to the said Academy in good Houses, at the low Price of 33% Dollars, and from that to 40 dollars per annum.

November 22, 1802.

Raleigh Register, November 22, 1802.

CASWELL ACADEMY EXAMINATION, 1803.

On the 4th ult. the Public Speaking, etc., commenced at the Caswell Academy, which was performed with approbation and applause; and on the 5th, the Examination began on those parts of the Studies in which the Students had been engaged the previous half year; and it is with pleasure the Trustees announce to the public, that the progress they have made, and the accuracy with which they passed their several examinations, much exceeded their expectations, and was honorable to themselves, and to their Preceptors.

By Order of the Board, Henry Atkinson, Clk.

Raleigh Register, August 1, 1803.

CASWELL ACADEMY UNDER HUGH SHAW.

This Seminary, established on the pure patriotic Disposition of its Friends to cultivate Science and Literature, has increased in Number beyond the Expectation of its most sanguine Patronage. There are, at present, upwards of fifty Students who evince the strongest Proofs of expanding Genius, and discover the Advantage of an early Education. * * * The Trustees, at their last Meeting, have again contracted with the Rev. Hugh Shaw, as Principal Teacher, for the ensuing Year, whose Capability and moral Character has been highly approved. The School will also be furnished with an Assistant Teacher in the Languages. They have also employed Mr. Bartlett Yancey, a young Gentleman of approved Talents, to teach the English Language Grammatically, under the Direction of the Principal Teacher. * * *

December 8, 1803. The Trustees.

Raleigh Register, December 9, 1803.

CASWELL ACADEMY UNDER MR. DONOHO.

The Exercises of Caswell Academy will commence with the beginning of the next year, under the direction of Mr. Sanders Donoho. Terms of Tuition will be Fourteen Dollars for the Latin and Greek Languages, the same for Geography, with the use of the Maps and Globes; and seven dollars for the English Language.

December 20, 1804. Henry Atkinson, Treasurer.

Raleigh Register, January 28, 1805.

CASWELL ACADEMY UNDER MR. BOWLES.

The Exercises of the Caswell Academy will commence as usual, on the first of January next under the direction of Mr. James Bowles, who will teach the different branches of Literature, to wit: Reading, Writing, English Grammar, the Latin and Greek Languages, Arithmetic, Geography, Geometry, Trigonometry, Natural and Moral Philosophy, with Astronomy, etc.

The Trustees flatter themselves, that being provided with an excellent pair of Globes, a set of fine Maps, and some geometrical apparatus, with the healthy situation of the Academy, the cheapness of board, and the qualifications of their Teacher, Parents and Guardians will find it to their interest to send their children to this institution.

The Trustees vouch themselves that due attention shall be paid to the tuition and morals of the Students.

Boarding may be had in convenient and respectable families for forty and forty-five dollars per year.

By order, A. Murphey.

December 23, 1805.

Raleigh Register, January I3, 1806.

CASWELL ACADEMY UNDER MR. CALDWELL.

The Trustees of Caswell Academy inform the Public, that they have employed Mr. John W. Caldwell, of Guilford county, to take charge of that Seminary, at the commencement of the ensuing year.

November 17, 1807. The Trustees.

Raleigh Register, December 24, 1807.

CASWELL ACADEMY ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1808.

The Trustees of the Caswell Academy inform the Public, that they have employed Mr. John W. Caldwell, of Guilford County, to take charge of that Seminary, at the commencement of the ensuing year. Boarding can be had for fifty Students, within one mile and a half of the Academy, in genteel and respectable families, at forty-five and fifty dollars. It is presumed the situation and healthiness of the place, and the character and abilities of the teacher, will induce parents and others to send their children to this place.

November 17, 1807. The Trustees.

Raleigh Register, November 19, 1807.

CASWELL ACADEMY FOR 1809.

The Trustees of this seminary have the pleasure of informing the public that they have again employed Mr. John W. Caldwell, formerly of Guilford as Principal Teacher in the Academy. The character of this gentleman as a profound linguist and a good teacher is well known. * * * The exercises of the Academy will go into operation on the 1st of January. The superior advantage which this institution has over country seminaries of the kind, in having an elegant and complete set of Globes and Maps, and being situated in a healthy part of the country, where morality and religion are celebrated and respected, the Trustees offer as an inducement to parents and guardians to send 'heir children and wards to this place. There is little or no inducemerit for young men to become dissipated, and every species of vice and irregularity is checked in its infancy. The laws of the institution and plan of education are modeled after those of the University, in order that boys who lay the rudiments of their education here may complete it at that place. B. Yancy, Secy.

Raleigh Register, December 22, 1808.

STAR EDITORIAL NOTICE, 1810.

CASWELL ACADEMY.

Of this Seminary Mr. John W. Caldwell is Principal. The School is said to be a good one. Board in the vicinity is remarkably low.

Raleigh Star, March 15, 1810.

CASWELL ACADEMY STILL UNDER MR. CALDWELL.

The Trustees of this Institution have the pleasure of announcing to the Public that they still retain in their employment for the next year Mr. John W. Caldwell, a gentleman of distinguished talents and learning as a Preceptor; and under whom has been the direction of the Academy for several years.

Caswell, December 30, 1809. B. Yancy, Sec'y.

Raleigh Star, January 18, 1810.

CASWELL ACADEMY FOR 1811.

The Trustees of the Caswell Academy have the pleasure of informing the Public, that they have again employed Mr. John W. Caldwell as their Principal Teacher, for the ensuing year. * * * as also Mr. James Kerr, a young man of the strictest sobriety and temperance as an Assistant. * * *

December 15. S. Gbaves, Sec'y.

Raleigh Register, December 21, 1810.

CASWELL ACADEMY FOR 1812.

The Trustees of Caswell Academy * * * have again employed Mr. John W. Caldwell, as Principal of the Academy. * * * Caswell County, December 27, 1811.

Raleigh Register, January 3, 1812.

HICO ACADEMY.

Legislation, 1804.

An Act to Establish an Academy in the Lower End of Caswell County. Whereas, a number of the citizens of this and the adjacent counties, are desirous of establishing an academy for the promotion of learning in the lower end of the county aforesaid, and having liberally subscribed for the purpose of carrying the same into effect, and trustees being appointed, they therefore are desirous of receiving the sanction of the Legislature by an act to incorporate them. Therefore,

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That John Ogilby, John M'Aden, Thomas J. Moore, Samuel Smith, James Rainey, Swepson Sims and Herndon Haralson, Esquires, shall be, and they are hereby declared to be a body politic and corporate, to be known and distinguished by the name of "The Trustees of the Hico Academy," and by that name shall have perpetual succession; and that they the trustees and their successors by the name aforesaid, or a majority of them, shall be able and capable in law to take, demand, receive and possess all monies, goods and chattels that shall be given for the use of the said Academy, and the same apply according to the will of the donors; and by gift, purchase or devise, to take, have, receive, possess, enjoy and retain to them and their successors forever, any lands, rents, tenements and hereditaments of what kind or nature soever, in special trust and confidence, that the same or the profits thereof be applied to and for the use and purposes of establishing and endowing the said Academy, and all purchases by them made of real and personal estate in their names as trustees aforesaid, and all contracts entered into by them as aforesaid, are hereby declared to be as good and valid to all intents and purposes, as if they had been heretofore a body politic and corporate.

Chapter XLI, Laws of

HICO ACADEMY WANTS A TEACHER.

THE HICO ACADEMY.

IN THE LOWER END OF CASWELL COUNTY.

Being nearly ready for the reception of Students, the Trustees are anxious to contract with some Gentleman as Principal Teacher, who can come well recommended for Morals and a Knowledge of the different Languages, Arts and Sciences. A Person who has been in the habit of teaching, would be preferred. Such a character will meet with liberal Encouragement on early Application to

James Rainey,
Thomas I. Moore,

July 26, 1805. John McADEN.

Raleigh Register, August 26, 1805.

HICO EMPLOYS SHAW AND COTTRELL.
THE HYCO ACADEMY.

The Trustees of the Hyco Academy (in the lower end of Caswell County) with pleasure inform the Public, that they have contracted with the Rev. Hugh Shaw, as Teacher of the Languages, etc. and the Rev. Thomas Cottrell, as Teacher of English, Reading, Writing, etc. who will take charge of this Seminary on the 1st of January next; where will be taught the Latin and Greek Languages, Geography, Philosophy, Astronomy, History, Euclid's Elements, English Grammar, Arithmetic, Reading, Writing, etc. * * * Terms of Tuition, for Reading, Writing and the common Rules of Arithmetic, seven dollars; for English Grammar, and its application to the Languages, also the higher branches of Arithmetic, ten dollars; for Latin, Greek, etc. sixteen dollars per annum, paid quarterly in advance.

November 10. Tho. I. Moore, Clk.

Raleigh Register, November 25, 1805.

HICO CONTINUES MR, SHAW.

HYCO ACADEMY

Will open on the first day of January next, for the Reception of Students. The Trustees having again engaged the Rev. Hugh Shaw as Principal Teacher, with a suitable Teacher in the lower Branches, are induced to hope that they will again meet with that Encouragement from the Public which they have so liberally experienced the present Session, and which the advantages attached to the Institution are calculated to secure.

December 18, 1806.

Raleigh Register, January 26, 1807.

HICO CONTINUES MR. SHAW FOR 1808.

HICO ACADEMY.

The Trustees of the Hico Academy respectfully inform the Public, that they have engaged the Rev. Hugh Shaw, as Principal Teacher, and the Rev. Thomas Cotterell, as Assistant Teacher, for the ensuing year. * * *

December 17.

Raleigh Register, December 2Jf, 1807.

HICO ADVERTISES A LOTTERY.

HYCO ACADEMY LOTTERY.

The Trustees of the Hyco Academy, solicitous more liberally to encourage and perpetuate the advantages arising from this Seminary, and conscious of the ill success in a direct application to the generosity of the public, obtained an act of the Legislature of this State, to raise a sum by way of Lottery to be applied by said Trustees to the use and benefit of the said Academy, and now most respectfully offer the scheme to their fellow citizens and solicit their patronage. * * *

Red House, February 1, 1810. John McAden, President.

Raleigh Star, March 1, 1810.

HICO LOTTERY DRAWING.

HYCO ACADEMY LOTTERY.

At a general meeting of the Trustees, they resolved to commence the drawing of the Hyco Academy Lottery on the 15th of August next, at the Red House, and have appointed the following gentlemen to superintend and manage the same, to wit: Dr. John McAden, Samuel Smith, James Rainey, Herndon Haralson, Col. George Lea, Edmond Dixon and Thomas Bouldin. It is expected that those gentlemen who have or may receive Tickets to sell and do not return them by that time, will account for the price thereof in cash. The Trustees flatter themselves that the benevolent and all friends to learning and virtue (particularly when they recollect the great misfortune in the destruction of the late Hyco Academy by fire, and that a new and elegant two story building is contracted for, the first floor and walls of which are to be of brick, and are now in a considerable state of forwardness,) will not only themselves, but cause others to become adventurers in this Lottery. Few Lotteries of the same magnitude present prospects of equal benefit with as little risk.—Price of Tickets only three dollars— highest prize $1000, lowest $5, and two blanks to a prize only. The known integrity of the managers warrants justice to adventurers.— Tickets may be had from any of the Trustees and at most of the Stores and Post-Offices in Person and Caswell.

George W. Jeffreys, Cl'k.

Red House, Caswell County, June 9, 1811.

The Star, June 28, 1811.

HYCO EMPLOYS ABEL GRAHAM.

HYCO ACADEMY.

The Trustees of Hyco Academy have completed an elegant Brick House Building, and have contracted with Mr. Abel Graham to superintend this institution, the ensuing year. * * * English Language grammatically, the Latin and Greek Languages, with the usual branches of Science, will be taught in this Academy. * * * The Exercises will commence on the first day of January, 1813. * * * Board on moderate terms may be procured at the Red House, within half a mile of the Academy, where arrangements have been made to receive ten or fifteen Students. * * *

At which place an assortment of Latin, Greek and English Books are now on hand for sale, for the accommodation of the Students. *******

Raleigh Register, November 27, 1812.

HICO ACADEMY FIRE.

HYCO ACADEMY.

Notwithstanding the Wood Work of this Academy has again been consumed by Fire, Preparations have been made for the reception of Students, and the School will go into operation on Monday the 4th of January, 1813, under the superintendence of Mr. Abel Graham as Principal Teacher. * * * The Wood Work of the elegant Brick Building will be completed again perhaps by the first of May, for the reception of Students and for the operation of the School.

Caswell County, N. C., December 28, (1812).

Raleigh Register, January 8, 1813.

HICO BUYS MAPS AND GLOBES.

THE HYCO ACADEMY.

* * * The Trustees have procured for the use of the school a pair of large and elegant Globes and a complete set of Maps on the most approved scale. * * * They have employed Mr. Holbrook for the next year. * * * E. D. Jones, Clerk.

Red House, Caswell, June 20.
Raleigh Register, July 1, 1814.

HMO EMPLOYS L. HOLBROOKS.
THE HYCO ACADEMY.

The Trustees take this method of announcing to the Public, that this institution, notwithstanding its several misfortunes, is now in a complete state of readiness for the reception and accommodation of Students, where they may be correctly taught the Latin and Greek Classics and a general course of Science by Mr. L. Holbrooks. * * * The above branches of Education will be taught for Twenty Dollars per year, paid quarterly in advance. The School will go into operation on the first Monday in January next. * * *

Red House, Caswell, December 23, 1813. E. D. Jones, Clk.

Raleigh Register, January 7, 1814.

HYCO EMPLOYS JOHN H. HINTON.

HYCO ACADEMY.

* * * The services of Mr. John H. Hinton, under whose direction the Academy has been placed during the present year, are engaged for the next. He was educated at the University and afterwards taught, with reputation, both in the College and in the Preparatory department at that place. The system on which he teaches is, therefore, precisely the same which is there adopted, and the course of studies such as to render the Academy in every respect preparatory to the University.

The very essential branches of Classical education—correct pronunciation, according to the rules of Prosody, Scanning, and the derivation and composition of words—so much neglected in other Academies, here receive particular attention.

Proper attention is also paid to the English education of classical students; and as a Sabbath exercise McDowell's Bible Questions will in future be taught. * * * Geo. W. Jeffreys, Sec'y.

Red House, Caswell County, December 11.

Raleigh Register, December 24, 1818.

HICO PREPARES FOR UNIVERSITY.

HYCO ACADEMY, MAY 30TH, 1818.

* * * The inconvenience and loss of time the Students from many other Academies in the State experience on going to the College, from having attended to their studies in a different order from that established there, and from having pursued such as are not auxiliary to admittance, or if at all, are very remotely so, have been long and very justly a subject of dissatisfaction with those going to the University. These difficulties are obviated in this Academy by the establishment of precisely the same studies that are pursued at the College, in the lower classes and in the Preparatory School there. So it may be truly said that this school is strictly preparatory to the University. The Trustees would do great injustice to Mr. John H. Hinton, were they not to express in terms of high approbation their sense of the manner in which he has conducted this Institution during the last session. * * *

June 2, 1818. George W. Jeffreys, Sec'y.

[From account of the examination in 1818.]

Raleigh Register, June 12, 1818.

HICO CONTINUES MR. HINTON.

HYCO ACADEMY.

The Exercises of this Institution will be resumed on Monday the 3d of January, 1820, under the superintendence of Mr. John H. Hinton (formerly of the University) as Principal. The Latin and Greek Languages and the principal branches of the Sciences are taught here, and Students are prepared to enter the University with the highest credit. * * * G. W. Jeffreys, Sec'y.

Red House, Caswell, December 14.

Raleigh Register, December 17, 1819.

HICO EMPLOYS MABLON KENYON.

HYCO ACADEMY.

The Trustees of this institution have the pleasure of announcing to the public, that they have employed Mr. Mablon Kenyon, A. M., as principal teacher for the ensuing year. This gentleman is a graduate of one of the Northern Colleges, and has been engaged in teaching, both in public Academies and as a private tutor for several years. He is qualified to teach the various branches of the sciences, and the Latin and Greek Languages with skill and correctness; and under his care the Trustees will continue to render this academy in its studies strictly preparatory to the University, as it has been so eminently for several years.

The exercises of this institution will commence on the 8th of January ensuing.

Board may be had in the neighborhood at many respectable houses convenient to the Academy, upon very cheap terms.

The prices of tuition are as usual with other Academies.

G. W. Jeffreys, Sec'y.

Red House, Caswell County, December 11, 1820.

(Adv.) The Star, December 15, 1820.

HICO EMPLOYS DABNEY RAINEY AS ASSISTANT.
HYCO ACADEMY.

The Trustees * * * have employed Mr. Mablon Kenyon, A. M. to take charge of this Academy for the ensuing year. * * * Mr. Dabney Rainey is employed as assistant. * * *

November 22, 1821. Geo. W. Jeffreys, Sec'y.

Raleigh Register, November 30, 1821.

HICO CONTINUES MR. KENYON.

HYCO ACADEMY.

The Trustees take pleasure in informing the Public, that they have employed Mr. Mablon Kenyon, A. M. to take charge of this Academy for the ensuing year. From his judicious management, upright conduct, close attention to the duties of the institution and the consequent improvement of the Students, and the general satisfaction given the present year, we feel a confidence in asserting, that under its present Principal it as least equals its former character, and is in reality one of the most eligible institutions in the State for preparing Students to enter the University. We therefore again solicit patronage of our friends and the public in general. Mr. Dabney Rainey is employed as assistant. His capability for governing and instructing has been manifested both in the Academy and elsewhere. Every branch of English and Classical Education usually taught in Academies, will be taught in this; and no applicant for admission who bears a good moral character, will be rejected for want of preparatory study to enter the class. Prices of tuition on our usual moderate terms. Board and Washing can be had in the neighborhood in respectable families at thirty-five dollars per Session. Strict attention will be paid to the behavior and Moral deportment of the Students.

The Exercises of the Academy will commence on Monday the 21st January. Geo. W. Jeffreys, Sec'y.

Red House, Caswell County, November 22, 1821.

N. B.—The almost invariable good health of the Students in Hyco Academy and its vicinity during the last summer when sickness prevailed in most other parts of the country, we think, is no small recommendation of the place.

Raleigh Register, January 11, 1822.

HICO ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1834.

HYCO ACADEMY

Situated near the Red House

Caswell County, N.C.

The Summer Session of Hyco Academy will commence on Tuesday the 1st day of July under the superintendence of a gentleman who has enjoyed the advantages of a regular collegiate education, and much successful experience as an instructor of youth, whose testimonials from the President and Professors of the College at which he was graduated, as well as from his patrons, and other gentlemen of great respectability, are full and unexceptional. At this Academy, young gentlemen may acquire a good English and classical education; or they may be thoroughly prepared for admission to any College or University in the United States. The Superintendent pledges himself, that no exertions shall be wanting on his part, to promote the welfare and rapid improvement of his pupils, and merit the approbation and confidence of his patrons. The agreeable and well cultivated society, as well as the extraordinary healthfulness of the neighborhood in which this Academy is situated, (and it is confidently believed that no neighborhood in the United States is more healthy,) and its remoteness from scenes of dissipation, are circumstances well calculated to recommend it to the favorable consideration of parents and guardians. Board may be procured in the most respectable and well regulated families, at the rate of $7 per month. The scholastic year will be divided into two equal sessions of five months. The rate of tuition (payable in advance) will be as follows, viz.

Some of the elementary branches of English education, per Session $8.00 Other branches of English education, 10.00

Latin or Greek Languages or Mathematics, 15.00

Persona wishing to become acquainted with further particulars, are respectfully referred to the following gentlemen and patrons of the Academy, viz. Dr. John McAden, Dr. David Pointer, Capt. William Irvine, James W. Jeffreys, Esq. and Rev. D. A. Montgomery, of Caswell county, and Dr. Thomas P. Atkinson, of Halifax county, Va. Communications may be addressed to the Principal of the Academy, at the Red House, N. C.

June 10, 1834.

The Star, Raleigh, June 19, 1834.

SPRINGFIELD ACADEMY.

SPRINGFIELD ACADEMY,
In the upper end of Caswell County

Will commence on the first day of October, under the direction of Mr. William C. Love, from the University of North Carolina, where the English and Latin Languages will be taught. Mr. Love is a young gentleman who possesses handsome acquirements, and a good moral character; this, together with healthiness of the situ- tion, will doubtless be an inducement to many Gentlemen to send their sons. Boarding, Washing and Lodging (notwithstanding the bad prospect of Crops) may be had for twenty students, within one mile and a half of the School, at Forty-five dollars each, per annum; and it is hoped this institution will be so conducted as to answer the most sanguine expectation of those Gentlemen who may think proper to send their sons.

By order of the Trustees. M. Duke Mitchell, Clk.

September 4, 1804.

Raleigh Register, September 24, 1804.

SPRINGFIELD EMPLOYS W. C. CLARKE.

SPRINGFIELD ACADEMY.

The Examination of the Students attached to the Seminary in this vicinity known by the name of Springfield Academy, under the superintendence of Mr. William C. Clarke, took place on Thursday last. A gentleman who was present and much gratified at the exhibition, informs us that the exercises were well sustained throughout, and that most of the pupils displayed a proficiency not less honorable to industry of the scholar than creditable to the talents of the Teacher.

Raleigh Register, Thursday, July 7, 1831.

MISS PRENDERGAST'S SCHOOL.

A Female Seminary is now preparing and will commence Teaching on the 1st day of next October, at Mr. Brice Collins, in Caswell county, North Carolina, about 4 miles north of Mr. McCauley's Store; where will be taught the following Sciences by the Subscriber, to wit, Orthography, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, English Grammar, Needlework, Drawing, Painting, Embroidery, Geography and the Use of the Maps, also Scanning Poetry—where due attention will be given. The price of Tuition Ten Dollars per Year to be paid quarterly. * * *

Caswell, September 9. Rachel Prendergast.

Raleigh Register, October 2, 1818.

MILTON FEMALE ACADEMY, 1819.

The building for the Female Academy in this place, being nearly completed, the Trustees take this method to inform the public, that it will go into operation on the 2d Monday in January next under the special direction and superintendence of the Rev. Abner W. Clopton. In employing Mr. Clopton to superintend the Academy, they have not only consulted their own feelings in regard to a public ministry, but they have had also particular regard to public sentiment in relation to the institution. Most parents choose to place their daughters at institutions where they may enjoy the advantages of religious instruction.

And while the Trustees have acted with deference to this disposition, they have taken the necessary steps to secure the most efficient means of combining, with religious privileges, the best opportunities of the literary and ornamental branches of education. For this purpose they expect to have two of the best tutoresses that can be procured from Philadelphia or New York.

The prices of Board and Tuition will be regulated by those of the Oxford Female Academy, and will be required in advance.

The first session will end on the second Monday in June.

By order, R. M. Sanders, Sec'y.

Having been employed by the Trustees to superintend the Female Academy, in Milton, I submit the following remarks to the consideration of such as may be unacquainted with the prospects of this institution. While literary institutions are constantly multiplying, it must be a subject of pleasing reflection to pious parents, if not to others, that religious instruction forms a prominent feature in some of these institutions. * * * It is a fact too notorious to be doubted, and too serious not to be lamented, that many parents have awfully neglected the pious instruction of their children. * * * The superintendent of the Salem Academy having been consulted on the subject gave it as his decided opinion, that a minister of the Gospel should take charge of our institution. And the Trustees, wishing to give to their system of education every advantage that the public might require, determined to follow his counsel. * * *

We cannot, at present, name our Tutoresses. But it may be confidently understood, that none but such as are in all respects qualified, will be employed. The Trustees would not have delayed the procurement of them until this time, if they had not been disappointed in their expectations of obtaining some from Elizabeth Town. There will be public worship, in the Academy, regularly twice on every Lord's day—- in the forenoon and at night; and the pupils will have religious exercises appointed them invariably, on the afternoon of the same day. * * * Parents may be well assured also, that their daughters, while here, will be as effectually debarred from all scenes of profane merriment, and revelling, as are the pupils of the Salem School. * * * Milton, N. C., December 2, 1819. A. W. Clopton.

In addition to the above, the Trustees have the pleasure to announce to the public, that two young Ladies, by the name of Thomas, of the city of New York, having offered their services, will be employed as Tutoresses in our Academy.

These ladies, being members of the Episcopal Church, whose pastor is the Rev. Mr. Lyle, will come recommended by him; and by the Rev. Dr. Spring, pastor of the Presbyterian Church ; and by the Rev. Mr. Williams, pastor of the 2d Baptist church, in the city of New York. * * *

Raleigh Register, December 31, 1819

PICKARD'S SCHOOL.

The subscriber has opened a School in Caswell county, near Brown's Store, for the instruction of youth, in the rudiments of the English, Latin and Greek Languages. — Geography, with the use of the Globes. Natural and Moral Philosophy &c will also be taught. This School is 10 miles west of Caswell Courthouse, and 7 miles east from Rockingham Springs. John H. Pickard.

November 25.

Raleigh Register, December 3,

MISS BALLANTINE'S SEMINARY.

M1ss Ballantine will open a Seminary for Young Ladies, on the 5th September inst. at Gen. A. Graves' in the upper end of Caswell County. The situation is very pleasant and adjacent to the Rockingham Springs. The course of instruction will be carried on in a regular system, embracing all the Scientific and Ornamental Branches necessary to complete the Female Education. She will also deem it her imperious duty to pay particular attention to the morals and manners of the Young Ladies committed to her care.

Pupils from a distance can be accommodated with board by Mrs. Lea, whose residence is quite convenient to the school house. Her terms of board are $35 per session. The first session will end on the 20th of December next; and a proportionable deduction will be made in the price of tuition and board on account of the shortness of the session.

Prices Of Tuition.

For the 1st Class $10.00

2d do 12.50

3d and 4th Class 15.00

All Ornamental Branches will be taught at the usual prices.
Caswell County, September 1, 1825.
Raleigh Register, September 6, 1825.

MRS. STITH'S SEMINARY.

MRS. STITH

Has opened a Seminary for young Ladies near the store of Q. Anderson, Esq. in Caswell County, where she proposes to teach the next year:—the next session will commence of the second day of January next. The course of instruction will be carried on in a regular system, embracing the Sciences and Ornamental branches usually taught in Female Seminaries. She will also deem it her imperious duty to pay particular attention to the morals and manners of the young ladies committed to her care. Mrs. Stith would furnish young ladies with board, at Fifty Dollars per year. Tuition Sixteen Dollars—or in proportion for a shorter time.

Caswell, September 25, 1825.

Raleigh Register, October 4, 1825.

LEASBURG CLASSICAL SCHOOL.
TO THE PUBLIC.

A New Preparatory School.

The Subscriber has, with a view to a permanent location, made arrangements to open on the 19th inst. a Classical School in Leasburg, Caswell county, N. C. in which will be taught those branches of Literature and Science usually taught in the best Preparatory Schools. The much neglected studies of composition and declamation will receive more than an ordinary degree of attention.

The Principal will conscientiously consider himself not only the instructor of the minds of his pupils, but of their manners and morals also. The Principal considers himself as very fortunate in his location. He is convinced that students can pursue their studies here, with fewer temptations to morals and distractions to study than in most county seats, in which Classical Schools are generally located.

Leasburg is a neat, rural village, and is every way eligible as a school location, whether we regard the healthiness of its situation, the intelligence and morality of its inhabitants, or the cheapness of board which (including firewood, washing, candles, &c. &c.) will range from five to seven dollars.

The Academy is of brick, and situated in a beautiful grove of oaks. The school room is comfortable and commodious. The Tuition fees per session will be as follows, viz.

For the languages, Greek, Latin and French $15.00

" higher branches of English 12.50

" lower do do 10.00

Leasburg, Jan. 2, 1835. Wm. H. Owen, Principal.

The Star, January 15, 1835.

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